9:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
Music

The Vaccines Make A Music Video With Your Concert Photos

The Vaccines
Courtesy of the artist

The Vaccines, a London-based indie rock band with a retro sound, are partnering up with popular photo app Instagram to make a crowdsourced music video for their song "Wetsuit." They're asking fans to share photos from the band's summer tour using the app on their smartphones.

Vaccines guitarist Freddie Cowan, guitarist for The Vaccines, says he's already seen a huge response: "Pictures of people on their campsites and people covered in mud in England or people in the sun in Europe. And candid shots of us."

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8:51am

Mon August 8, 2011
The Two-Way

Treasury Secretary Geithner: S&P Has 'Shown Really Terrible Judgement'

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner.
Michael Nagle Getty Images

In an interview with CNBC, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said Standard& Poor's "has shown really terrible judgment and they've handled themselves very poorly," when it downgraded the United States' rating.

"They've shown a stunning lack of knowledge about basic U.S. fiscal budget math. And I think they drew exactly the wrong conclusion from this budget agreement," Geithner added.

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8:37am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

U.S. Markets Drop After S&P Downgrade

Investors reacted to Standard & Poor's downgrade of American credit by selling off U.S. stocks. Monday was the first trading day since S&P downgraded the U.S. government's credit rating on Friday.

8:36am

Mon August 8, 2011
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The End Of A Physics Worldview: Heraclitus And The Watershed Of Life

Greek philosopher Heraclitus once said "the world bubbles forth," suggesting a natural magic beyond the entailing laws of modern physics.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

At the dawn of Western philosophy and science, some 2,700 years ago, Heraclitus, declared that, "the world bubbles forth." There is, in this fragment of thought, a natural magic, a creativity beyond the entailing laws of modern physics. I believe Heraclitus was right about the evolution of the biosphere and human life. We live beyond entailing law in a natural magic we co-create.

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8:25am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

U.S. Stocks Fall On Downgrade Of U.S. Credit

U.S. markets have opened for the first time since Standard and Poor's downgraded the nation's credit rating. The Dow Jones industrial average fell more than 250 points minutes after the opening bell on Wall Street.

8:13am

Mon August 8, 2011
Opinion

The Nation: Mainstream Media Ignores Real People

Washington residents, dressed as clowns, takes part in a jobs demonstration outside of the Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington Wednesday, July 27, 2011.
Jose Luis Magana AP

Leslie Savan blogs for The Nation about media and politics.

Right before a break on The Daily Rundown the other day, host Chuck Todd was talking about the debt deal and mentioned "unemployment lines." Then he announced, "Coming up: Did Washington take its eye off the ball of what really matters?"

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8:13am

Mon August 8, 2011
Opinion

Weekly Standard: Finger-Pointing Pundits Go Crazy

The arguments in Washington are enough to drive anyone crazy.
iStockphoto.com

Zack Munson writes for The Weekly Standard.

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7:42am

Mon August 8, 2011
The Two-Way

From Cuba To Florida: A 61-Year-Old Starts The 103-Mile Swim

Diana Nyad delivers a speech at Ernest Hemingway Nautical Club, in Havana.
Adalberto Roque AFP/Getty Images

Diana Nyad attempted it once before. It was 1978 when she was 28, but 42 hours into what's supposed to be a 60-hour swim, her team pulled the plug. Nyad, a world-class endurance swimmer, had been defeated by nature: the water temperature was a tad cool and the wind produced sizable waves.

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7:05am

Mon August 8, 2011
Opinion

Foreign Policy: History Doesn't Quite Repeat Itself

Members of a pro-Islamic human rights group and Syrians living in Turkey gather, one holding a placard that reads, "we did not forget Hama" as they stage a protest against the Syrian regime and its leader Bashar Assad during a protest outside the Syrian embassy in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, Aug. 1, 2011.
AP

David Kenner is an associate editor at Foreign Policy.

Something was stirring in the Syrian city of Hama. The Assad regime appeared to be losing control; it had issued vague warnings about an Islamist takeover, but had gone ominously silent for over a week. A government-planned trip to the city was canceled. Syrian officials warned privately that any attempt by intrepid journalists to visit Hama would be "life-threatening."

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6:54am

Mon August 8, 2011
Opinion

New Republic: A Lesson From The Great Depression

A family of migrant workers flees from the drought in Oklahoma camp by the roadside in Blythe, California, during The Great Depression.
Dorothea Lange Getty Images

John B. Judis is a senior editor of The New Republic and a Visiting Scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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