8:00am

Sat July 9, 2011
NPR Story

Rupert Murdoch Rules More Than The 'World'

The scandal that has collapsed the British tabloid, News of the World, and rocked the News Corp empire, brings into question the pervasive influence of Rupert Murdoch's media holdings on British media and politics. NPR's David Folkenflik examines the extent of Murdoch's influence and his cozy relationships with politicians.

8:00am

Sat July 9, 2011
Africa

In Uganda, American Becomes Foster Mom To 13 Girls

Four years ago, Katie Davis was homecoming queen at her high school in Tennessee. Today, she cares for 13 abandoned girls at her home in Uganda.
Courtesy of Stylianos Papardelas

Four years ago, Katie Davis was homecoming queen at her high school in Brentwood, Tenn. She had a yellow convertible and planned to study nursing in college.

But those plans changed just a little. Today, she's in Uganda, sharing her home with 13 orphaned or abandoned girls, ages 2 to 15. Davis is the legal guardian or foster mother for all of them, and hopes to one day adopt them.

Read more

7:59am

Sat July 9, 2011
Music News

Peter Tosh: Reclaiming A Wailer

Peter Tosh performs at the University of Miami in 1976.
Lee Jaffe Courtesy of Sony Music

This story contains language that may be objectionable to readers.

Bob Marley and the Wailers: The two names are practically inseparable. But in the years since they became the most prominent reggae band of all time, another name has diminished in history: Peter Tosh.

Read more

5:00am

Sat July 9, 2011
Music News

'The Magic Flute,' Distilled To An Essence

Abdou Ouologuem, Dima Bawab, Thomas Doliz and William Nadylam in a scene from director Peter Brook's A Magic Flute.
Courtesy of Lincoln Center

Legendary British stage director Peter Brook has made a career of deconstructing and reinvestigating the classics. He rearranged the soliloquies in Shakespeare's Hamlet, and cut the chorus from Bizet's Carmen and set it in a bullring. Now, at 86, Brook is taking on one of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's best-loved works, The Magic Flute.

Read more

5:00am

Sat July 9, 2011
Space

Shuttle Legacy: Grand, Though Not What Was Planned

Originally published on Sun July 10, 2011 6:53 am

The shuttle, as seen in this mid-1970s illustration, was envisioned as a low-cost, quick-turnaround truck to space.
NASA

If you opened up a copy of the magazine Popular Science back in 1974, you'd see an artist's conception of a blastoff for the new spaceship that NASA was building. The headline: "Reusable Space Shuttle ... Our Biggest Bargain In Out-Of-This-World Research." The era of cheap, routine spaceflight was about to begin.

Read more

5:00am

Sat July 9, 2011
Politics

Poor Jobs Numbers Add Urgency To Budget Talks

It turns out that was no bump in the road the economy hit this spring. It was more like a concrete jersey barrier.

Hiring came to a near standstill last month, with paltry gains in the private sector almost completely offset by layoffs in the government. A report from the Labor Department shows employers added just 18,000 jobs in June. That's even worse than the dismal numbers from the month before. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate ratcheted up to 9.2 percent.

There wasn't a scrap of good news in the Labor Department's report for President Obama to seize on.

Read more

4:24am

Sat July 9, 2011
Energy

Student Brain Power Turns Exercise Into Electricity

Courtesy Drexel University Office of Student Life and Administrative Services

If only all the speed and strength of youth could be channeled into power. Turns out, it can. Some colleges and universities have started converting energy from exercise equipment into electricity.

One of those schools is Drexel University in Philadelphia, where student power runs straight into their buildings' power grids. Dan Simmons, director of recreation at Drexel, says a typical 30-minute workout on a treadmill can generate enough energy to hold a light bulb for 2.5 hours.

Read more

2:26am

Sat July 9, 2011
Middle East

Poppy Crops Set To Bloom If Afghanistan Aid Withers

Originally published on Wed July 13, 2011 12:01 am

An Afghan holds a bouquet of poppies near the city of Kandahar, Afghanistan.
Majid Saeedi Getty Images

In case you missed it, June 26 was the International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking. Afghanistan, the world's largest provider of opium poppy, did mark the occasion — with a bonfire.

Standing near an 11-ton mountain of seized opium, hashish and alcohol on the outskirts of Kabul, Gen. Baz Mohammad Ahmadi welcomed officials to the drug-burning ceremony.

Ahmadi, the country's deputy minister for counternarcotics, appealed for a strong international effort against narcotrafficking. He also asked for more cooperation from his own government on the issue.

Read more

9:44pm

Fri July 8, 2011
Remembrances

Former First Lady Betty Ford Dies At 93

Former first lady Betty Ford has died at the age of 93.

During her life she helped change the way Americans think and talk about breast cancer, women's rights and substance abuse.

But, before she became a first lady, an advocate for women's rights and an inspiration to people struggling with addiction, Betty Ford was a dancer.

Read more

8:00pm

Fri July 8, 2011
The End Of The Space Shuttle Era

From The Movies, Lessons On Privatizing Outer Space

Hollywood history is littered with cautionary tales about corporate takeovers of outer space, but in 2001: A Space Odyssey, things looked oddly familiar: Interstellar travelers flew Pan Am and stayed in Hilton hotels.
MGM

During the space race in the 1960s, only governments had deep enough pockets to send humans into orbit. Now, with many of the world's governments in hock up to their eyeballs and NASA's space shuttle going into retirement, commercial ventures are poised to pick up where the shuttle leaves off.

Read more

Pages