8:00am

Sun June 12, 2011
Education

Teachers Speed-Date For Jobs In Rhode Island

Earlier this year, the city of Providence, R.I., fired all of its nearly 2,000 teachers, shut down five schools and consolidated some programs. Most of the fired teachers were rehired, but when the dust settled, 400 teachers were left without jobs. To give them a chance to apply for 270 positions elsewhere the district, Providence officials are using an unusual device. From member station WRNI, Elisabeth Harrison reports.

8:00am

Sun June 12, 2011
Afghanistan

Blame For Afghan Casualties Falls On The West

The UN is planning to release civilian casualty figures for the month of May this weekend, and the toll could be the highest yet. NPR's Quil Lawrence reports that even though three-quarters of the victims were killed by the Taliban or other militants, it is the U.S. and its NATO allies that bear the brunt of the criticism from Afghans.

8:00am

Sun June 12, 2011
World

Elections May Put Drag On Turkey's Ruling Party

Turks are voting in parliamentary elections on Sunday. The secular opposition is mainly fighting to keep the ruling party from winning too big a majority so it doesn't have a completely free hand when it comes to re-writing the country's constitution. Guest host Jacki Lyden talks with NPR's Peter Kenyon about what's at stake.

8:00am

Sun June 12, 2011
NPR Story

Civil War Balloon Brigade Flies Again

To help union troops scout during the Civil War, President Lincoln signed off on a plan to create a volunteer balloon brigade. A commemoration at the National Mall honored the event on Saturday, complete with a gas-filled balloon and period dress. Allison Keyes reports.

8:00am

Sun June 12, 2011
Politics

Scandalized And Scattered: This Week In Politics

This week we saw a prominent member of Congress brought low by salacious behavior on Twitter. We also saw a shift in the batting order of Republican candidates for president in 2012. Guest host Jacki Lyden talks politics with NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson and NPR's Andrea Seabrook.

8:00am

Sun June 12, 2011
Europe

French Reconsider Sexual Attitudes After IMF Scandal

Former IMF director Dominique Strauss-Kahn's attempted rape charges have caused a great stir in both the U.S. and France. Initially, it seemed to highlight cultural differences between the two countries around sexual politics. Lately, however, French attitudes have begun to change. Host Jacki Lyden speaks to the senior editor of Le Monde, Sylvie Kauffmann, about whether the scandal has changed the way gender relations are viewed in France.

7:58am

Sun June 12, 2011
Animals

Killing One Owl Species To Save Another

A female northern spotted owl in California. Spotted owls are losing habitat to invasive barred owls, a species originally from the eastern U.S.
National Park Service

Spotted owls are on the decline despite two decades of work to bring them back. So, later this month, wildlife officials are releasing a new plan to protect the owls, and it includes a controversial new approach: eliminating their cousins.

In a dense forest near Muir Woods, just north of San Francisco, National Park Service ecologist Bill Merkle plays a recording of a spotted owl in hopes of hearing from a real one.

"I think they're just probably 50 or 60 feet up there," he says.

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7:54am

Sun June 12, 2011
The Two-Way

First Post-Shooting Photos Of Rep. Giffords Released

Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, in a recent photo. It was posted on her Facebook page earlier today (June 12, 2011).
Facebook.com/GabrielleGiffords

A smiling Rep. Gabrielle Giffords can be seen this morning in the first photos released of the Arizona Democrat's face since she was shot in the head on Jan. 8.

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8:01pm

Sat June 11, 2011
Art & Design

A Spirited Celebration Of America's 'Cocktail Culture'

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:45 am

Lillian Bassman's photograph The V‐Back Evenings shows model and actress Suzy Parker having a drink (and some fun) in 1955.
Lillian Bassman Harper's Bazaar

As you enter Cocktail Culture, an intoxicating exhibit of apparel, accoutrement and ephemera at the Rhode Island School of Design's Museum of Art, it's hard not to think of Billy Strayhorn's lyrics in his jazz standard "Lush Life":

I used to visit all those very gay places
those come-what-may places
where one relaxes on the axis of wheel of life
to get the feel of life
from jazz and cocktails

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8:01pm

Sat June 11, 2011
Food

Move Over, Microwave: A Pressure Cooker Comeback?

Water normally boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit — and doesn't get hotter. But under pressure, it boils at 242 F. In a pressure cooker, food cooks at a higher temperature, which speeds up the cooking process. Above, a 1948 pressure cooker.
Chaloner Woods Getty Images

Is your job a pressure cooker? Most people are familiar with the metaphor, but not the actual device — once a common household item.

"It was the wedding gift that you gave. People got a pressure cooker," says Lorna Sass, author of The Pressured Cook. She says when Presto introduced its version of the gadget at the 1939 World's Fair, it didn't take long for it to catch on.

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