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10:01pm

Sun January 8, 2012
Law

Texas Redrawn: Voting Rights, States' Power In Court

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 1:10 pm

The Texas State Capitol in Austin. The Lone Star State is gaining four additional congressional seats because of its booming population, but its redistricting plans are in limbo.
Eric Gay AP

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Monday in a tangle of Texas redistricting cases, with repercussions beyond the Lone Star State. Consolidated into one test, the cases pit the Voting Rights Act and its protections for minority voters against state legislative powers — with an overlaying sheen of sheer political calculus.

The case has been called a puzzle of three courts, a reference to the interplay between two lower courts and the Supreme Court.

A Chance To Redraw

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10:01pm

Sun January 8, 2012
The Salt

For Kids With ADHD, Some Foods May Complement Treatment

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 1:55 pm

Eliminating junk food from a child's diet is usually not enough to effectively treat attention deficit disorders, a paper shows.
Tarah Dawdy via Flickr

You may remember the controversial studies linking food coloring and additives to hyperactivity in kids. Or you may know parents who have pinned their hopes on an elimination diet to improve their kids' rowdy behavior.

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10:01pm

Sun January 8, 2012
The Arab Spring: One Year Later

Is The Arab Spring Good Or Bad For The U.S.?

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 7:09 am

The Arab uprisings have ousted or weakened some American allies. Elections in Tunisia and Egypt have shown the strength of Islamist political parties. And after the long, hard war in Iraq, the U.S. appears to have a diminished appetite for new, complicated undertakings in the region. In the last of our six-part series on the upheavals changing the Middle East, NPR's Deborah Amos looks at what it all means for America.

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10:01pm

Sun January 8, 2012
History

Dancing Through History With First Ladies' Gowns

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:09 am

First lady Michelle Obama's inaugural gown.
Hugh Talman Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Every four years in January, Washington, D.C., plays host to the country's biggest "prom." Inaugural balls bring out happy winners, administration bigwigs and a gown — on the first lady — that will become a part of history.

An exhibition at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History displays some of those gowns. NPR Special Correspondent Susan Stamberg took her dance card to the show.

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10:01pm

Sun January 8, 2012
Europe

Italy's Accordion Industry: Tiny And Thriving

Italy's famed accordion industry has all the business it wants — but there are limits to its ambitions.
Marco Di Lauro Getty Images

More than 70 percent of Italy's gross domestic product comes from small businesses — and they're not growing. Economists are worried this will make it impossible for Italy to climb out of its massive $2.6 trillion debt.

Even in a global economy, something as small as Italy's accordion industry can have an impact. The work of its craftsmen has reached millions of ears.

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