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10:07am

Mon October 10, 2011
Sports

Woods Finishes 30th After Bizarre Hot Dog Incident

Tiger Woods, hits from the tee on the ninth hole on the final round of the Frys.com Open. Two holes earlier, his birdie putt attempt was interrupted by a man throwing a hot dog onto the green.

Robert Laberge Getty Images

The Frys.com Open brought the first PGA Tour win for Bryce Molder, who joined the tour in 2002. But the tournament was also memorable for Tiger Woods, who played well — and survived having a hot dog thrown at him on the putting green.

Molder holed a 12-foot birdie putt on the 18th that got him into a playoff with Briny Baird. Molder then outlasted Baird on the sixth extra hole, the longest playoff on tour this year, by making a 6-foot birdie putt.

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10:06am

Mon October 10, 2011
NPR Story

Netflix Backpedals On Qwikster Service

The company says it is scuttling its plan to split off its DVD-by mail and streaming video services.

10:00am

Mon October 10, 2011
Music

Jonathan Wilson: Making Like Thoreau, In Song

Jonathan Wilson's new album is titled Gentle Spirit.

Nick Walker Courtesy of the artist

Record producer Jonathan Wilson recorded his new album Gentle Spirit during little slivers of time when the artists he was working with — among them songwriter Jackson Browne and the rock band Dawes — were on break. The project took him four years to finish, and it's the musical equivalent of a landscape painting.

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8:58am

Mon October 10, 2011
The Two-Way

Netflix Kills Qwikster; Price Hike Lives On

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:20 am

Packages of DVDs await shipment at Netflix's headquarters in San Jose, Calif.

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Bowing to customers' anger and confusion over its move to divide its streaming and DVD video offerings, Netflix is reversing itself, snuffing the plan to offer DVDs by mail via a new service called "Qwikster." News of the backpedaling move was published on the company's blog early Monday.

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7:36am

Mon October 10, 2011
The Salt

In Peru, A Hunt For Chocolate Like You've Never Tasted It

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 11:05 am

Farmers dry cacao beans in Uchiza, Peru, a file photo from 2008. Researchers are exploring the wild cacao bounty of Peru's Amazon Basin, part of an effort to jump-start the country's premium cacao industry.

Martin Mejia AP

Christopher Columbus first encountered the cacao bean on his final voyage to the New World some 500 years ago. It took a while for Europeans to embrace the taste — one 16th-century Spanish missionary called the chocolate that indigenous people drank "loathsome."

But by the 17th century, chocolate met sugar, and it became a hit the world over — it's now a $93 billion a year global industry, according to market research firm Mintel.

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