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2:53am

Sat October 8, 2011
Author Interviews

The 'Blue Horse' That Inspired A Children's Book

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 1:44 pm

Eric Carle Penguin Young Readers Group

Even if you don't know the name Eric Carle, his work has probably made you smile. He's the author and illustrator of more than 70 children's books, including The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? His books brim with bold and unique collages, bursting with color and clever words.

Carle has a new children's book about an artist who — like the author — enjoys stepping out of the box. It's called The Artist Who Painted A Blue Horse.

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2:22am

Sat October 8, 2011
Africa

Dalai Lama's Absence Looms Large At Tutu's Birthday

Originally published on Sat October 8, 2011 8:20 pm

Children help retired Archbishop Desmond Tutu blow out candles on a cake during a celebration of his 80th birthday in Stellenbosch, South Africa, on Friday.

Rodger Bosch AFP/Getty Images

In downtown Cape Town, worshippers gathered Friday for a morning Mass at St. George's Cathedral. During apartheid, the massive stone church was an epicenter of resistance against the South African government. On Friday, a service was held to honor the man who led that resistance, Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu.

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10:00pm

Fri October 7, 2011
National Security

Veterans, Civilians Don't See Eye To Eye On War

Saturday begins the 11th year in the war in Afghanistan, and a new poll shows that veterans and the general public have different views on war, the value of military service — and even patriotism.

David Gilkey NPR

Veterans and the general public have different views on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the value of military service, and even the subject of patriotism, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center.

The United States has never seen a moment like this one, the Pew Center says. Sustained combat for a decade, and a small fraction of American men and women in uniform.

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5:06pm

Fri October 7, 2011
The Two-Way

Looking Into The Galaxy's Heart (It's Red)

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This infrared mosaic image, taken by the Hubble telescope, represents the "sharpest survey of the Galactic Center to date," NASA says.

NASA

For its popular "photo of the day" feature, NASA gives us a look at the center of the galaxy, in the form of an infrared image — because as I'm sure you already know, infrared can penetrate the dust clouds that obscure the core in the visible spectrum.

This is the area that NASA uses to form ideas about how massive stars are formed, and how they influence other objects.

The image above, taken by the Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer, has a "false color," NASA says, in order to show "the glow of hot hydrogen in space."

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3:52pm

Fri October 7, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Drone Controllers Said To Be Infected By Computer Virus

Some of the computers controlling America's fleet of drone aircraft are reportedly infected by a persistent virus. In this file photo, a senior airman remotely operates an MQ-9 Reaper during a training mission at Creech Air Force Base in Indian Springs, Nev.

Ethan Miller Getty Images

Let's say you have people using computers to control unmanned aircraft that are useful for both gathering information and destroying targets on other continents. If you had a choice, those would probably not be the computers you'd like to see infected by a virus — but that's what has happened to some U.S. systems that control Predator and Reaper drones, according to Wired's Danger Room blog.

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