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5:02am

Sat September 17, 2011
Economy

Median Male Worker's Income Lower Than In 1973

Tuesday the government's annual poverty and income report revealed that the earnings of male workers in the middle of the income ladder are lower today than they were almost 40 years ago.

In 1973 the median male worker earned just over $49,000 when adjusted for inflation, while in 2010 that worker made about $1,500 less. Yet, in the same period, the output of the economy has more than doubled, and the productivity of workers has risen steadily.

What Has Changed

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4:28am

Sat September 17, 2011
Around the Nation

Irene Aftermath: When It Rains, It Spores

Black trumpet mushrooms are among the 24 varieties of mushrooms that Pat McDonagh of Northampton, Mass., eats. She says that there are more than 1,000 varieties in the woods — and there's been an abundance since Hurricane Irene tore through the Northeast.
Anne Mostue for NPR

When Hurricane Irene tore through the Northeast last month, it caused severe flooding and damage to homes, trees and power lines. But it also left behind something rather delicate — mushrooms.

Foragers say they've seen more fungi in the past few weeks than ever before.

On a recent weekday morning in Northampton, Mass., three 50-something adults wander into the woods. The oak leaves fall alongside the pine needles, and the tall maple trees are just starting to show color.

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4:10am

Sat September 17, 2011
Around the Nation

'On The Edge' In Mississippi: Residents Cling To Land

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:23 am

Occasional flooding is part of life on the batture, between the Mississippi River and the levee.
Kevin O'Mara

In the netherworld of the batture between the levee and the Mississippi River near New Orleans, there is a small community built on stilts. Locals call them "camps": a dozen eccentric structures — some rundown, some handsome, all handmade — clinging to the river side of the great dike.

One man has been fighting for years to claim this land, which he says belongs to his family, but those living on the batture don't seem too worried about losing their homes.

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3:42am

Sat September 17, 2011
Author Interviews

'The Arrogant Years': An Egyptian Family In Exile

Lucette Lagnado's parents started their lives together in late '40s Cairo.

Her father was Jewish, a charmer who hobnobbed with the city's social elite. Her mother, Edith, was also Jewish — a brilliant, bookish, beautiful girl who read all of Proust before she was 15, became chief librarian of a Jewish school in Cairo, and was a protege of the wife of an Egyptian dignitary, or pasha.

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3:29am

Sat September 17, 2011
World

U.S. Underwhelmed With Emerging Powers At U.N.

It's the time of year when world leaders converge at the United Nations headquarters in New York. And this year, there will be a lot of talk about multilateral diplomacy — a priority for the Obama administration since it came to office.

Obama's team has courted the world's rising powers, even publicly backing India's hopes to one day be a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council. But now that India, along with South Africa and Brazil, have rotating seats on the council, U.S. officials and many human rights activists complain they're not living up to expectations.

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