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5:20am

Fri August 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Developing: Explosion At U.N. Building In Nigeria; Bomb Suspected

Breaking news from The Associated Press:

"A large explosion struck the United Nations' main office in Nigeria's capital Friday, flattening one wing of the building in Abuja. A U.N. official in Geneva called it a bomb attack.

" 'I saw scattered bodies,' said Michael Ofilaje, a UNICEF worker at the building. 'Many people are dead.' He said it felt like 'the blast came from the basement and shook the building.' "

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5:00am

Fri August 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Irene On Track To Soak N.C., Barrel North Toward New York

Head inland: Nags Head, N.C., is among the many communities along the East Coast that are, or have been, evacuated as Irene draws near.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Though Hurricane Irene has weakened slightly and its projected track has been nudged east just a bit, it's still headed for what could be a devastating collision with the East Coast of the U.S. that will affect tens of millions of people from North Carolina to New England over the weekend.

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4:17am

Fri August 26, 2011
Asia

After 15 Months In Office Japan's Leader Steps Down

Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan announced his resignation on Friday. He held the top leadership position for 15 months. His popularity dropped after the government was criticized for its handling of the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster. Kenneth Cukier, the Tokyo correspondent for The Economist, about the political situation in Japan.

3:10am

Fri August 26, 2011
Around the Nation

Texas Drought Takes Its Toll On Wildlife

It's not only people suffering from the drought in Texas. Susan Edwards, manager of Wildlife Rescue, holds a juvenile raccoon. The raccoon should at least be double in size, but its mother's milk was lacking needed nutrients.
John Burnett NPR

The unfolding calamity that is the Texas drought has thrown nature out of balance. Many of the wild things that live in this state are suffering.

Sections of major rivers — like the Brazos, the Guadalupe, the Blanco, Llano and Pedernales — have dried up. In many places, there aren't even mud holes anymore.

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2:00am

Fri August 26, 2011
Africa

Will Libyan Rebel Council Stay United After Gadhafi Is Defeated?

In Libya, the rebel government calls itself the Transitional National Council. Many of its members have remained anonymous since the start of the rebellion, but as Moammar Gadhafi's regime comes closer to an end, we're learning more about who exactly they are. Political scientist Ali Ahmida talks to Renee Montagne about the rebel leadership, and whether they all share the same goals. Ahmida is author of "The Making of Modern Libya."

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