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10:01pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Science

'Shrimp On A Treadmill': The Politics Of 'Silly' Studies

"Shrimp on a treadmill" has become a euphemism for questionable government spending on scientific research. The actual research study was focused on how water quality affects a shrimp's performance.
Lou Burnett College of Charleston

Biologist Lou Burnett was recently in his car when his cell phone rang. It was a CNN reporter, asking about the fact that his research had been featured in a new report about wasteful government spending.

That was news to Burnett, who works at the College of Charleston in South Carolina. "I was pretty irritated," he recalls.

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10:01pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Technology

Young Entrepreneur Has A Better Idea. Now What?

Originally published on Tue August 23, 2011 6:30 am

Meredith Perry demonstrates her invention at All Things Digital, an annual tech conference.
Asa Mathat AllThingsD

Meredith Perry turned 22 this month. She just graduated from college and started a new company built around a technology she recently invented.

There's plenty of bad economic news these days, but Perry and her company, called UBeam, are trying to defy it — she's hiring and entertaining funding offers from investors.

Perry's invention: a transmitter that can recharge wireless devices using ultrasonic waves. It's like Wi-Fi, she says, except instead of a wireless Internet connection, her's transmits power over the air.

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10:01pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Politics

Rahm Emanuel's First 100 Days As Mayor: 'I Love This'

Former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel served two presidents, represented Illinois in Congress, and on Tuesday, will mark his 100th day as mayor of Chicago. He promised early to put his own mark on Chicago as he took on the city's challenges. Some think he's succeeding.

In the anteroom at City Hall, Emanuel is surrounded by Chicago memorabilia. A few books about Chicago sit near caps of the city's sports teams. The new mayor says he has no regrets about leaving the national stage.

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10:01pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Author Interviews

'The Great A&P': Revolutionizing Modern Retail

Brothers George and John A. Hartford opened the first A&P Economy Store in 1912. This storefront photo dates from around 1915.
Hartford Family Foundation

Long before there was Walmart, there was The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Co., a giant retailer that used its scale to bring down prices while earning the scorn of independent retailers.

The company, better known as A&P, got its start in the mid-1800s selling tea in Lower Manhattan. But in 1912, brothers John and George Hartford opened an all-new "no frills" Economy Store, revolutionizing the way we buy our food.

Author Marc Levinson talks to NPR's Renee Montagne about what made the burgeoning chain so successful.

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10:01pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Economy

Advocates Urge Easier Visa Policies To Boost Startups

As the economy continues to sputter, many policymakers are looking to entrepreneurs to create new jobs. And many foreign-born, highly skilled entrepreneurs want to come to the United States and stay here, but immigration laws and policies haven't made that easy.

In an effort to change that the White House recently announced more flexible policies for granting visas. But many innovation experts say the changes aren't enough.

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