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10:00am

Tue August 23, 2011
U.S.

Changes To Immigration Policy: Fairness Or Phony Amnesty?

The Obama administration is planning to review about 300,000 illegal immigration cases and prioritize deportations of undocumented individuals with criminal records. Those who haven't committed crimes may be allowed to apply for work permits in the U.S. Host Michel Martin discusses the new policy rule with Rep. Charles Gonzales (D-Texas), who chairs the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, student Mario Perez, and his attorney Sarah Monty.

9:59am

Tue August 23, 2011
The Two-Way

Coulson Received Payment From News Corp., After Taking Downing Street Job

Andy Coulson, formerly editor of the tabloid News of the World, and later David Cameron's director of communications, speaks on a mobile phone in London on April 13, 2010. London police arrested Andy Coulson on July 8 in relation to Britain's tabloid phone-hacking scandal.
Oli Scarff AP

Britain's phone hacking scandal took another sharp turn today, after the BBC reported that a former editor at News of the World received payment from News International, even after he took a job as the Prime Minister's top press aide.

The BBC reports:

These payments were part of his severance package, under what is known as a "compromise agreement".

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9:05am

Tue August 23, 2011
Crisis In The Housing Market

Racial Gap In Homeownership Widens In U.S. Slump

Clyde Jackson (right) poses for a photo with his son, Clyde Jr., outside their new two-bedroom apartment in Greenbelt, Md. Jackson lost his three-bedroom home to foreclosure in December.
Alex Kellogg NPR

When Clyde Jackson's wife took a $6 hourly pay cut several years ago, it was the beginning of his rapid descent from two-time homeowner to renter in an apartment complex in the working-class Washington, D.C., suburb of Greenbelt, Md.

Jackson, 51, is an African-American father of three who works for a local government sanitation agency. In December, he lost a three-bedroom brick home to foreclosure. He purchased the house for $245,000 in 2004.

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8:54am

Tue August 23, 2011
News

Behind King Memorial, One Fraternity's Long Battle

The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial opened to the public on Monday. It will be officially dedicated on Sunday.
Allison Keyes NPR

The thousands of visitors at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington this week will reflect on the controversial likeness of the man, his legacy and the significance of the first nonpresident — and first African-American — immortalized on the National Mall.

But most of them probably won't know who built it.

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8:48am

Tue August 23, 2011
The Two-Way

New Home Sales Decline To Five-Month Low In July

Two years into the economic recovery, the housing market is still showing signs of struggle. New numbers released by the Commerce Department today showed that purchases of new homes fell 0.7 percent in July and hit the lowest level in five months.

Bloomberg reports:

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