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10:26am

Tue August 23, 2011
U.S.

New Rules Aim For More Passenger-Friendly Skies

Passengers wait in line at the United Airlines terminal at Chicago's O'Hare airport in 2009 after a computer malfunction caused long delays and the cancellation of some United flights.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Anyone who flies on an airplane should like some new government regulations that took effect Tuesday. Passengers who get involuntarily bumped will be entitled to more compensation, and airlines face stiffer penalties for long tarmac delays on international flights.

The new rules are aimed at making flying more convenient and hassle-free, according to the Department of Transportation. Secretary Ray LaHood says the new passenger protections will "help ensure that air travelers receive the respect they deserve before, during and after their flight."

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10:05am

Tue August 23, 2011
The Two-Way

Judge Dismisses Charges Against Dominique Strauss-Kahn

A New York judge dismissed the sexual assault case against the former head of the International Monetary Fund. The AP reports that the ruling won't take effect, however, until an appeals court hears the accuser's request for a special prosecutor.

Yesterday, prosecutors asked the judge to drop the charges against Dominique Strauss-Kahn, because of issues with the credibility of his accuser.

The AP adds:

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10:00am

Tue August 23, 2011
Africa

Fighting Rages On Inside Tripoli

Rebels recently swept inside Libya's capital. They're facing pockets of violent resistance from forces loyal to Colonel Moammar Gadhafi. To learn about the battle for Tripoli and what a post-Gadhafi era may mean for the region, host Michel Martin speaks with a representative of the Libyan Transitional National Council and Al Jazeera International's Washington Bureau Chief.

10:00am

Tue August 23, 2011
U.S.

Changes To Immigration Policy: Fairness Or Phony Amnesty?

The Obama administration is planning to review about 300,000 illegal immigration cases and prioritize deportations of undocumented individuals with criminal records. Those who haven't committed crimes may be allowed to apply for work permits in the U.S. Host Michel Martin discusses the new policy rule with Rep. Charles Gonzales (D-Texas), who chairs the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, student Mario Perez, and his attorney Sarah Monty.

9:59am

Tue August 23, 2011
The Two-Way

Coulson Received Payment From News Corp., After Taking Downing Street Job

Andy Coulson, formerly editor of the tabloid News of the World, and later David Cameron's director of communications, speaks on a mobile phone in London on April 13, 2010. London police arrested Andy Coulson on July 8 in relation to Britain's tabloid phone-hacking scandal.
Oli Scarff AP

Britain's phone hacking scandal took another sharp turn today, after the BBC reported that a former editor at News of the World received payment from News International, even after he took a job as the Prime Minister's top press aide.

The BBC reports:

These payments were part of his severance package, under what is known as a "compromise agreement".

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