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8:34am

Wed August 3, 2011
Opinion

The Nation: A Heavy Hearted Deal

This video image provided by Senate Television shows the Senate floor on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2011, after the Senate has approved an emergency bill to avert a first-ever government default with just hours to spare.
AP

John Nichols, a pioneering political blogger, has written the Beat since 1999.

Following in uneasy but steady lockstep behind the Republican-controlled US House of Representatives, the Democrat-controlled US Senate voted 74-26 Tuesday to endorse the deal between President Obama and Congressional Republicans that will impose massive cuts in federal programs in return for a temporary hike in the debt ceiling.

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8:33am

Wed August 3, 2011
Opinion

Weekly Standard: Resilient Boehner Bounces Back

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, attends a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Aug. 1, 2011, to discuss the debt ceiling legislation.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Fred Barnes is executive editor of The Weekly Standard.

For House speaker John Boehner, Tea Party Republicans weren't the problem as he sought support for a package of spending cuts attached to an increase in the debt limit. The biggest impediment to a House majority was Republicans fearful a primary opponent would use a vote to boost the debt limit against them.

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8:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
U.S.

FAA Operations Up In The Air Amid Shutdown

Originally published on Wed August 3, 2011 11:42 am

A fence secures the perimeter of a half-completed 236-foot FAA control tower at Oakland International Airport. Construction has been halted because of the FAA shutdown.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

A partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration, prompted by a political dispute, is adding to the country's debt. This month alone, that shutdown will cost the Treasury $1 billion in uncollected airline ticket taxes.

The shutdown is happening because of a labor dispute, a long-standing rivalry and a disagreement over subsidizing small airports. It's not clear when it will all be resolved now that members of Congress are leaving Washington, D.C., for their summer recess.

NPR's Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Brian Naylor about what's behind the standoff.

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7:46am

Wed August 3, 2011
Krulwich Wonders...

Living Very, Very Narrowly

Courtesy of Jakub Szczesny Centrala

There are two apartment buildings in my Manhattan neighborhood that share a block. They sit very close. One is about nine inches from the other. In the small vertical space between them, a horde of finches have built themselves nest upon nest upon nest rising for nine human floors. It's a finch skyscraper. In March and April you can see finches busily flying in and out of this vertical crack, bearing twigs, grasses and nest-building material.

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7:42am

Wed August 3, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

First Death In Mysterious Salmonella Outbreak Tied To Ground Turkey

Cases of salmonella linked to the Heidelberg strain of the bacterium.
CDC

Seventy-seven people have gotten sick and one has died in a salmonella outbreak that's appears to be caused by tainted ground turkey, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

And the bacterial strain investigators are closing in on — Salmonella Heidelberg — is potentially quite bad because it's resistant to a lot of common antibiotics. That complicates treatment for people who get sick from it.

So why hasn't the government issued any turkey recalls?

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