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12:01am

Mon July 4, 2011
Afghanistan

For Some, The Decision To Enlist Offers Direction

Marine Lance CPL. Andrew Zemore, 23, from Fredericksburg, Va., is a self-described troublemaker who liked to party too much. Zemore said he fell into the Marine Corps and now is on a Explosives Ordinance Disposal (EOD) team where he searches out bombs with a hand-held metal detector.
David Gilkey NPR

A very small number of Americans are now serving in the military — less than 1 percent. Some are looking for direction; others are inspired by a sense of patriotism or by a family member who served in an earlier war. In the series Who Serves, NPR looks at the soldiers that made a decision few others today have — to fight in America's wars.

Private First Class Dave Kroha from Cromwell, Conn. is a lanky 23-year-old stuffed into the back of an armored vehicle that rumbles along a dusty road in Afghanistan. His wire-rimmed glasses are held together by tape.

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12:01am

Mon July 4, 2011
Food

Searching History For The Hot Dog's Origin

Fotofermer iStockphoto.com

On Monday, New York's Coney Island will host Nathan's Famous annual hot dog eating contest. The contest is in its 96th year.

But, the origin of the popular summer food is still cloudy.

Ben Zimmer, executive producer of the online magazine Visual Thesaurus, says there are a lot of myths about the name 'hot dog.' One is about a New York Evening Journal cartoonist, Tad Dorgan.

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12:01am

Mon July 4, 2011
Your Health

'Evil Scientist' Wants To Teach People To Do Good

Civics teacher Devin Carberry talks about the bystander effect in relation to the Holocaust with his high school class at the ARISE Charter School in Oakland, Calif.
Greg Miller From the April 29, 2011 issue of Science magazine. Reprinted with permission of AAAS.

In 1971, at Stanford University, a young psychology professor created a simulated prison. Some of the young men playing the guards became sadistic, even violent, and the experiment had to be stopped.

The results of the Stanford Prison Experiment showed that people tend to conform — even when that means otherwise good people doing terrible things. Since then, the experiment has been used to help explain everything from Nazi Germany to Abu Ghraib.

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12:01am

Mon July 4, 2011
Environment

Two Scouts Want Palm Oil Out Of Famous Cookies

Two Girl Scouts want the organization to stop using palm oil in Girl Scout Cookies. They've started a petition and gathered 67,000 signatures.
Andrew Prince NPR

A lot of adult environmentalists have been trying for years to focus attention on tropical rain forests in southeast Asia, but it took two teenagers to get the issue on the front page of a national newspaper and on the network news.

Four years ago, Rhiannon Tomtishen and Madison Vorva started studying orangutans for a Girl Scouts project. What they learned inspired them to start a campaign to raise awareness of the damage that palm plantations are causing the great apes.

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12:01am

Mon July 4, 2011
Campaign Vacations

In Iowa, Corn Is King And Candidates Are Everywhere

While campaigning for president in 2007, Barack Obama, then a senator from Illinois, drove a bumper car with his daughter Sasha at the Iowa State Fair.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Everybody knows that Iowa is the corn-growing capital of America. Agriculture is king.

And that means a top item on your campaign itinerary has to be the annual Iowa State Fair.

Some will check out the hog-calling contest. Then, they'll hit the midway and try out the fairgrounds delicacies — something deep-fried and served on a stick. And they'll drop by a booth run by the Des Moines Register, where they'll stand among the bales of hay and make a short, impromptu speech, as Hillary Clinton did four years ago:

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