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8:00am

Sun June 12, 2011
Education

Teachers Speed-Date For Jobs In Rhode Island

Earlier this year, the city of Providence, R.I., fired all of its nearly 2,000 teachers, shut down five schools and consolidated some programs. Most of the fired teachers were rehired, but when the dust settled, 400 teachers were left without jobs. To give them a chance to apply for 270 positions elsewhere the district, Providence officials are using an unusual device. From member station WRNI, Elisabeth Harrison reports.

8:00am

Sun June 12, 2011
Latin America

Puerto Rico Thrills To First Presidential Visit In 50 Years

President Obama's itinerary this week includes a trip to Puerto Rico on Tuesday, a significant event for Puerto Ricans both on the island and the mainland. The island is buzzing at the prospect of the first official presidential visit since John F. Kennedy went there in 1961. Guest host Jacki Lyden speaks to Puerto Rico's secretary of state, Kenneth McClintock, about the significance of the visit.

8:00am

Sun June 12, 2011
Africa

Clinton's Africa Tour Underscores The Power Of Women

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is touring U.S. aid projects in Tanzania Sunday, part of her big push to have women and girls at the center of development efforts in Africa. Food security is another key issue, as rising food prices spark fears of instability. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

8:00am

Sun June 12, 2011
From Our Listeners

Your Letters: V.S. Naipaul; Sicilian Cuisine

Many listeners remarked on guest host Jacki Lyden's commentary last week about author V.S. Naipaul's misogyny. Food commentator Bonny Wolf also offered a piece about how Sicily's history gives it a multicultural food tradition that is distinct from the rest of Italy. Host Jacki Lyden reads from listeners' letters.

7:58am

Sun June 12, 2011
Animals

Killing One Owl Species To Save Another

A female northern spotted owl in California. Spotted owls are losing habitat to invasive barred owls, a species originally from the eastern U.S.
National Park Service

Spotted owls are on the decline despite two decades of work to bring them back. So, later this month, wildlife officials are releasing a new plan to protect the owls, and it includes a controversial new approach: eliminating their cousins.

In a dense forest near Muir Woods, just north of San Francisco, National Park Service ecologist Bill Merkle plays a recording of a spotted owl in hopes of hearing from a real one.

"I think they're just probably 50 or 60 feet up there," he says.

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