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7:00am

Sat May 28, 2011
The Two-Way

VIDEO: Reporter Was Filming As RPG Hit His Head; He's OK

Carmen Gentile, freelance journalist, points to where an RPG hit his face.
USA Today

It felt "like being bashed across the cheek with a lead pipe."

That's how Carmen Gentile, a freelance journalist who has done a lot of reporting from Afghanistan for USA TODAY, describes what it was like last September when a rocket-propelled grenade fired at U.S. troops in Kunar province caught the side of his head.

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7:00pm

Fri May 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Marking Memorial Day

Members of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment this week placed flags at the graves in Arlington National Cemetery in preparation for Memorial Day.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Like many of you, we hope, The Two-Way is planning to take some time off over this holiday weekend.

We may put up a post or two, and will certainly jump back in if there's major news. But the general plan is to resume blogging Tuesday morning.

The reason Americans are have a long weekend, of course, is that Monday is Memorial Day. And that's much more than just the unofficial start of summer.

From this year's presidential proclamation:

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6:51pm

Fri May 27, 2011
The Two-Way

L.A. School District Tells Librarians: You're Not Teachers

The Los Angeles Unified School District plans to lay off thousands of employees, as it faces a budget shortfall of more than $640 million. The cuts include 85 school librarians — who have been told that they no longer count as teachers. The change in classification would make it easier for the school district to cut the jobs.

The librarians have been facing questions from the district's lawyers, as an administrative law judge seeks to determine if they should be considered as teachers.

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5:43pm

Fri May 27, 2011
Politics

Rand Paul, Tea Party Ask: What About Privacy?

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) speaks during a Tea Party Town Hall meeting in February at the National Press Club in Washington. The freshman lawmaker is being hailed by civil libertarians for putting privacy concerns over the Patriot Act back in the spotlight.
Alex Wong Getty Images

It's been nearly a decade since Congress, in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, hastily approved the USA Patriot Act and its historic expansion of law enforcement and domestic intelligence-gathering powers.

For just as long, civil libertarians have been agitating for legislators to hold a full-blown debate on the sweeping measure, fast-tracked to President George W. Bush's desk just four days after it was raised in Congress.

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5:34pm

Fri May 27, 2011
Middle East

Change Appears Inevitable In Syria, Analysts Say

U.N. Security Council diplomats have been studying a draft resolution condemning Syria for its deadly crackdown on demonstrators protesting the rule of President Bashar Assad. As the crisis drags on and the Security Council weighs its options, U.S. policymakers are trying to plan for what might come next. In Washington, there is a growing sense that Assad's rule is coming to an end.

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