NPR News

Pages

12:01am

Fri May 20, 2011
Health

Spinal Implant Spurs Motion In Paralyzed Man

Rob Summers was a 20-year-old college baseball pitcher when a hit-and-run driver ran him down, paralyzing him from the chest down. But that was five years ago. Summers can now move his legs, feet and toes, and he can even stand up.

That's because of an experimental treatment that combines intensive physical therapy with electrical stimulation of the spinal cord.

"To everyone's disbelief, I was able to stand independently, the third day we turned it on," Summers said.

That may sound just like flipping a switch, but it was hardly that easy.

Read more

12:01am

Fri May 20, 2011
Planet Money

Gold: The 4,000-Year-Old Bubble

Scott Olson Getty Images

Last fall, we bought a quarter-ounce gold coin. A few weeks ago, we sold it. The price of gold rose while we owned the coin. But because we had to pay a commission and sales tax when we bought it, we wound up losing a little money in the end.

In this story — the last in our series on gold and the meaning of money — we try to answer one final question: Is gold in a bubble?


Read more

12:01am

Fri May 20, 2011
Money Counts: Young Adults And Financial Literacy

Fresh From Service, Vets Face Daunting Job Market

Kevin Miracle, 30, was a staff sergeant in the Army's 82nd Airborne division and did two tours in Iraq and two in Afghanistan. After getting out of the military, he struggled to find a job. He now works at the Philadelphia Veterans Multi-Service and Education Center.
Nathaniel Hamilton WHYY

Veterans fresh from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are being hit hard by the reality of the current economy and the competition for jobs. The financial prospects for vets under 30 can be especially daunting.

Many are trying for the first time to translate their military skills into the marketable experience civilian employers are seeking.

Limited By An Injury

Read more

12:01am

Fri May 20, 2011
Author Interviews

Truth Mirrors Fiction In Pakistan's 'Bloodmoney'

David Ignatius is a foreign affairs journalist and the author of Agents of Innocence, Body of Lies and The Increment. He lives in Washington, D.C.
W.W. Norton & Company

"Americans did not like lying to others," David Ignatius writes in Bloodmoney. "It made them uncomfortable. Their specialty was lying to themselves."

Lying — to everyone, really — is the theme of his new espionage novel, set in present-day Pakistan. In the book, a Pakistani official asks whether Americans are conducting covert operations on Pakistani soil. And, as truth is so often stranger than fiction, it's a subject that has come under much scrutiny in the weeks since al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden was killed in a covert operation in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

Read more

10:00pm

Thu May 19, 2011
StoryCorps

Forgiving Her Son's Killer: 'Not An Easy Thing'

Mary Johnson, 59, spoke with Oshea Israel, 34, at StoryCorps in Minneapolis.
StoryCorps

It would be easy — expected, even — for Mary Johnson and Oshea Israel to be enemies. After all, he killed Johnson's only son, in 1993. He went to prison for that — and toward the end of his sentence, he and Johnson made peace.

As a teenager in Minneapolis, Israel was involved with gangs and drugs. One night at a party, he got into a fight with Laramiun Byrd, 20, and shot and killed him. Oshea is now 34; he finished serving his prison sentence for murder about a year and a half ago.

Read more

Pages