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8:00am

Sun May 8, 2011
Sports

Surprise Win A Dramatic Finish For Suspenseful Derby

The largest crowd ever packed into Churchill Downs Saturday for the 137th running of the Kentucky Derby, but much of the intrigue happened behind the scenes. Host Liane Hansen has an update of the final standings of the 2011 Kentucky Derby, where a horse named Animal Kingdom surged to a surprise victory.

8:00am

Sun May 8, 2011
From Our Listeners

Liane's Last Show Coming Soon; Share Your Memories

Originally published on Sun May 8, 2011 8:20 am

Transcript

TOM COLE: Liane Hansen is closing in on her last show. Her final broadcast as host of WEEKEND EDITION will be on Sunday, May 29th. Go to our website, NPR.org, to see a timeline of special moments on the program, going back to Liane's debut in 1989 - from the news of Nelson Mandela's release from prison, to an interview singer Joni Mitchell, and Liane's trip to Egypt. We want to hear your ideas for other special moments to add to the list. Go to NPR.org/Liane to offer a suggestion. That's NPR.org/L-I-A-N-E. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

8:00am

Sun May 8, 2011
Animals

Wildlife Shelter Cradles Littlest Tornado Victims

Relief workers in Alabama have been working round the clock to tend to victims of last week's tornadoes. But for volunteers at the Alabama Wildlife Center south of Birmingham, they're dealing with some of the smallest victims, wild birds. The center rehabilitates injured and orphaned birds throughout the year, but right now they're dealing with an influx of tornado-related animals. Andrew Yeager of member station WBHM reports.

8:00am

Sun May 8, 2011
National Security

Insights From Bin Laden's Home Videos

On Saturday, the Pentagon released several videos seized by U.S. forces from Osama bin Laden's raided Pakistani compound. NPR's Rachel Martin reports on their significance.

8:00am

Sun May 8, 2011
World

Pakistan Angry Over What It Didn't Know

The covert American operation that assassinated Osama Bin Laden has sparked widespread public anger in Pakistan. The biggest question: How could the U.S. have entered Pakistani territory and taken out the world's most wanted man without the knowledge of Pakistan's military? NPR's Julie McCarthy reports.

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