NPR News

Pages

1:50pm

Tue April 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Most Powerful Rocket Since Apollo Missions Planned

Plans for the world's "most powerful rocket since man went to the moon" were unveiled today.

As The Associated Press reports, "the rocket could lift twice as much cargo into orbit as the soon-to-be-retired space shuttle. Space Exploration Technology's new rocket, called Falcon Heavy, is big enough to send cargo or even people out of Earth's orbit to the moon, an asteroid or Mars. Only the long retired Saturn V rocket that sent men to the moon was bigger."

Read more

1:15pm

Tue April 5, 2011
Conflict In Libya

NATO: 30 Percent Of Libya's Weapons Are Destroyed

NATO said Tuesday that international airstrikes against Moammar Gadhafi's forces have destroyed 30 percent of Libya's military capacity, even as regime troops unleashed a withering bombardment against rebels outside an eastern oil town.

But the alliance said Gadhafi's forces had changed tactics in the besieged western city of Misurata by moving tanks and other heavy equipment to civilian areas to prevent pilots from targeting them.

Read more

1:12pm

Tue April 5, 2011
Science

Japan Accident Renews Focus On Spent Fuel In U.S.

The nuclear accident in Japan has rekindled debate about what to do with used reactor fuel.

The Japanese power plant housed tons of highly radioactive used fuel in pools filled with water. Some of that water either leaked out or boiled away during the accident, putting that fuel at risk of burning and releasing radioactive material. With similar fuel pools at more than 60 reactor sites in the U.S., there's renewed interest in their safety.

Read more

1:03pm

Tue April 5, 2011
Education

Georgia's HOPE Scholarship Dwindles Amid Cutbacks

Alonzo Mendez is the first person in his family to go to college. He's a 19-year-old student at Atlanta's Georgia Perimeter College and he's just one of many Georgia students who benefit from the state's HOPE scholarship, a program that uses lottery funds to pay college tuition for students who maintain a B average.

This year, state budget shortfalls and a drop in lottery revenue have led to cuts in HOPE scholarship funding. That means most students will no longer qualify for full scholarships, leaving many to wonder how they'll raise the cash to cover the extra costs.

Read more

1:00pm

Tue April 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Vindication? Tiger Mom's Daughter Accepted To Harvard And Yale

Sophia Chua-Robenfeld, the daughter of Amy Chua, has been accepted to both Harvard and Yale.

Amy Chua, if you don't remember is the Yale law professor who caused an uproar with her harsh philosophy toward parenting detailed in her memoir Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother.

The legal blog Above The Law, which first reported the story, called it a triumph of Chua over her critics:

Read more

Pages