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12:01am

Wed March 23, 2011
Health Care

As Health Law Turns 1, Debate Far From Settled

Wednesday marks a year since President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law.

But in those ensuing 12 months, the debate has barely missed a beat.

On Capitol Hill, Democrats have continued to sing the measure's praises.

"With this landmark law, we made health insurance and health care a right, not a privilege, for all Americans," said House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, "by extending coverage to 32 million more Americans."

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12:01am

Wed March 23, 2011
The Science Of Japan's Nuclear Crisis

First Eyes Inside Nuclear Plant May Be A Robot's

Workers in Japan want to look inside three troubled reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. But intense radiation inside the buildings means that it is too dangerous for them to enter. One solution? Robots. They're good at going places where people just don't want to go.

"The purpose of robots is to do those dull, dirty and dangerous missions — so dangerous is certainly what we're talking about here," says Tim Trainer, a vice president at iRobot, an American firm that has sent four of its robots to the company that owns the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

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12:01am

Wed March 23, 2011
Law

Supreme Court Weighs Rights Of 'Deadbeat' Parents

Go to any shelter for homeless families, and you likely will find children who would not be there but for their fathers' failure to pay child support.

Spend a day in family court, and you likely will see indigent fathers, with no lawyer, being taken away in handcuffs because they could not pay the child support they owed.

So-called deadbeat parents, usually dads, have long been a conundrum for the law. On Wednesday, they are the U.S. Supreme Court's legal problem.

Jailed For Being Too Poor?

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12:01am

Wed March 23, 2011
Youths And Gun Violence: Chicago's Challenge

Creating Calm In Chicago's Schools

Changing the culture of place is not an easy assignment. At Manley Career Academy High School on Chicago's poverty-racked West Side, a lot of hard work is happening in Room 113, known as the Peace Room.

Student Sharell Jones is here because she wants to explode.

"I'm trying to stay out of trouble because it is my senior year, and I have improved more on my attitude, and I have not been in no fights," Jones says. "Arguments, yeah, but no fights."

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12:01am

Wed March 23, 2011
Education

In Hartford, Parents Don't Always Pick Best Schools

Originally published on Wed March 23, 2011 11:20 am

The Hartford, Conn., school district slated the Moylan School for redesign last year.
Jeff Cohen for NPR

Like many other school districts, Hartford, Conn., rewards schools that perform well and closes schools that perform badly.

But Hartford is also a district that allows parents to choose their child's school. As the theory goes, parents should naturally choose the good schools over the bad ones — but as it turns out, they often don't.

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