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12:01am

Wed March 2, 2011
Law

U.S. Citizen Looks To Supreme Court For Vindication

The Supreme Court takes up a major case Wednesday stemming from the war on terrorism. At issue is whether former Attorney General John Ashcroft is entitled to immunity from a lawsuit claiming he misused the law to arrest a U.S. citizen under false pretenses.

A federal appeals court panel composed of all Republican appointees ruled 2-1 that the case should proceed to trial because the allegations, if true, are "repugnant to the Constitution." The Obama administration appealed to the Supreme Court.

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12:01am

Wed March 2, 2011
Afghanistan

Military Sensors Catch The Scent Of Roadside Bombs

In Afghanistan, the American military plays a chess game with the enemy: Insurgents plant deadly roadside bombs — often called improvised explosive devices, or IEDs. The Americans find ways to detect them.

Then the insurgents make their move, coming up with new ways to conceal them.

American military officials have spent billions of dollars trying to solve the problem of roadside bombs. They have come up with electronic jammers to block the signal that sets the bombs off. They use dogs to sniff out the bombs' components.

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12:01am

Wed March 2, 2011
Animals

For Turtles, Earth's Magnetism Is A Built-In GPS

Loggerhead turtles are born with an ability to know where they are on Earth, and which way to swim to get to favorable feeding grounds. That's the conclusion from a new study by scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The turtles appear to accomplish this by being exquisitely sensitive to the Earth's magnetic field. Humans using a compass can also tell which ways is north, "but a compass doesn't really tell you where you are," says UNC graduate student Nathan Putman.

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12:01am

Wed March 2, 2011
Africa

On The Front Lines Of A Bloody Battle For Mogadishu

Part three of a four-part series.

Somalia marks a terrible milestone this year: two decades of civil war.

African Union troops are defending a weak transitional government hunkered down in the capital, Mogadishu. The African soldiers are mostly Ugandan and largely funded by the United States.

Their goal: Push Islamist insurgents out of the city and create safe space for civilians.

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12:01am

Wed March 2, 2011
World

Who'll Fill Void If Gadhafi Falls? U.S. Wishes It Knew

In Libya, Moammar Gadhafi's regime may be hanging on longer than many analysts expected, but few people doubt that at some point it will fall.

The big question swirling around Washington is who or what will fill the void. The United States only renewed ties with Libya a few years ago — and it is scrambling to identify the next power broker there.

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