Barbara Bradley Hagerty

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is the religion correspondent for NPR, reporting on the intersection of faith and politics, law, science and culture. Her New York Times best-selling book, "Fingerprints of God: The Search for the Science of Spirituality," was published by Riverhead/Penguin Group in May 2009. Among others, Barb has received the American Women in Radio and Television Award, the Headliners Award and the Religion Newswriters Association Award for radio reporting.

Before covering the religion beat, Barb was NPR's Justice Department correspondent between 1998 and 2003. Her billet included the impeachment proceedings against President Clinton, Florida's disputed 2000 election, terrorism, crime, espionage, wrongful convictions and the occasional serial killer. Barbara was the lead correspondent covering the investigation into the September 11 attacks. Her reporting was part of NPR's coverage that earned the network the 2001 George Foster Peabody and Overseas Press Club awards. She has appeared on the PBS programs Washington Week and The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer.

Barb came to NPR in 1995, after attending Yale Law School on a one-year Knight Fellowship. From 1982-1993, she worked at The Christian Science Monitor as a newspaper reporter in Washington, as the Asia correspondent based in Tokyo for World Monitor (the Monitor's nightly television program on the Discovery Cable Channel) and finally as senior Washington correspondent for Monitor Radio.

Barb was graduated magna cum laude from Williams College in 1981 with a degree in economics, and has a masters in legal studies from Yale Law School.

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12:01am

Mon May 23, 2011
Religion

Doomsday Believers Cope With An Intact World

As recently as two weeks ago, Gary Vollmer was absolutely certain that on May 21, 2011, God would send devastating earthquakes, raise believers to heaven in the "rapture," and then destroy the world five months later. Now that it hasn't happened, Vollmer is unfazed.

"God is God, God's going to do what he has to do," he says.

True, he says, believers got some of the details wrong. But the thrust of the message is right.

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3:00pm

Wed May 18, 2011
Religion

Study: Changes Of 1960s Behind Church's Abuse Crisis

Why did the Catholic Church experience a sexual abuse crisis? There are no simple answers, according to a five-year study by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice that was released on Wednesday. But the reasons suggested in the report are unlikely to satisfy critics of the church.

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4:37pm

Thu May 12, 2011
Religion

Divining Doomsday: An Old Practice With New Tricks

Originally published on Tue May 17, 2011 1:27 pm

On the National Mall in Washington, D.C. last week, David Liquori (right) talks with passersby about May 21.
Mito Habe-Evans NPR

Margaret Pease stands on a corner in downtown Pittsburgh, handing out doomsday pamphlets.

"JUDGMENT DAY FOLKS!" she yells with a volume that would make a drill sergeant proud. "May 21, 2011!"

For the past seven months, Pease has been crisscrossing the country in a caravan with eight others, warning anyone who will listen that God's wrath is near.

"I might be a little loud, but I want people to get the message," she says. "I don't want anybody's blood on my hands. ... JUDGMENT DAY FOLKS!"

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7:29am

Sat May 7, 2011
Religion

Is The End Nigh? We'll Know Soon Enough

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:52 am

In Pittsburgh, Margaret Pease spreads the message that Judgment Day is fast approaching.
Jennifer Jordan WYEP-FM

Brian Haubert grabs some pamphlets and marches toward the flea market in Palmyra, N.J. Armed with a poster that trumpets Judgment Day on May 21, 2011, he braces for rejection. Announcing God's wrath is not always a popular message.

"I've been called a heretic," says Haubert, a 33-year-old actuary. "I've been told I read the wrong Bible. And then there's the occasional person who seems to be genuinely interested," he says.

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4:13pm

Wed April 27, 2011
Religion

John Paul's Rise Toward Sainthood: Going Too Fast?

The chants began even before Pope John Paul II had been put to his final rest, as his coffin was carried through St. Peter's Square: "Santo Subito! Santo Subito!"

"Sainthood now!"

A month later, Pope Benedict XVI — his successor and close friend — launched the process that would do just that. On Sunday, John Paul II will be beatified in Rome, bringing him one step away from sainthood.

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