Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a producer who works with Morning Edition and NPR.org, coordinating with radio and digital media staff to create Web features that complement stories heard on-air. He also frequently writes original Web pieces.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to writing for its World Cup 2010 blog. Chappell's assignments have included being the lead Web producer on NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as being the Web liaison and producer of the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps project.

Chappell was an integral part of the team that executed a comprehensive redesign of NPR's Web site in 2009. One year later, the site won its first Peabody and the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award, among others.

Drawing from his experience in improving NPR's storytelling ability, he trains both digital media and radio staff in using NPR's digital tools.

Other shows he has worked with include Fresh Air, All Things Considered, Talk of the Nation and Piano Jazz with Marilyn McPartland.

Prior to joining NPR in 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling regions from Asia and Africa to Europe and Latin America.

During the intensive early months of the Iraq War, he coordinated packages and live shots out of Qatar, Israel and Australia. During the war, he set up live interviews and brought in packages to supply content to CNN's global networks.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as Editor-in-Chief of the Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

Chappell's prior work included producing Web pages and editing digital video for CNNSI.com, as well as editing and producing news and features at CNN.com. His entry to CNN came via the network's central library, where he often manned the reference desk.

Chappell's entry into national journalism came after years of writing about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies. A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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3:05pm

Wed August 3, 2011
The Two-Way

As FAA Shutdown Continues, Workers Miss Pay, Medical Coverage

The FAA's partial shutdown doesn't affect air traffic controllers (above). But the impasse has left some 47,000 workers without a paycheck.
John Moore Getty Images

The FAA's partial shutdown will be coming up on the two-week mark Saturday, and there's little sign of movement on the issue. Here's a collection of recent developments to keep you updated:

The shutdown doesn't include air traffic controllers. But it has left 4,000 FAA employees, and an additional 70,000 contractors, either furloughed or fired outright.

NPR's Richard Gonzales spoke to Richard Zemlok, an electrician in Oakland, Calif., who was one of those left without a paycheck:

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12:06pm

Wed August 3, 2011
The Two-Way

Chinese City Bans Dogs, Telling Owners To Turn Them In

A sign reading "No Entry For Dogs" is posted near the Confucius Temple in a file photo from Nanjing, China. The city sought to remove stray dogs in 2007, prompted by fears of rabies.
China Photos Getty Images

Officials in Jiangmen, China, are banning residents from keeping dogs, in a move that will take effect at the end of August, according to Chinese media. In one week, owners can begin taking their dogs to drop-off centers, where they will be either adopted by residents of rural areas or euthanized.

The ban targets dogs in densely populated sections of Jiangmen, a city with a population of 3.8 million. Any owners who wish to keep their dogs must apply for a license, reports China Daily.

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4:17pm

Tue August 2, 2011
The Two-Way

After 57 Years, Man Looks To Sell Rare Gehrig Memorabilia

Jeffrey Quick, 69, holds a family photo of his parents and Lou Gehrig's mother as he and his wife, Joan, stand in their dining room. On the table next to them is a glove signed by Gehrig's Yankees teammates — a gift from Christina Gehrig.
Matt Rainey Matt Rainey for NPR

Jeffrey Quick doesn't have any family ties to legendary Yankees ballplayer Lou Gehrig. But his collection of mementos from Gehrig's life — a glove and a grade-school autograph book among them — are the kinds of things passed down from one generation to the next. And that's how Quick got them. Gehrig's mother, Christina, left them to Quick's mother, back in 1954.

As Quick tells All Things Considered co-host Michele Norris, his mother, Ruth Quick, briefly dated Lou Gehrig, back when he was a single superstar in New York.

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3:16pm

Tue August 2, 2011
The Two-Way

Reid Says FAA Shutdown Will Continue; Blames House, Delta Airlines

Construction equipment sits idle in front of the half-completed new control tower at Oakland International Airport. Thousands of construction workers on aviation projects have stopped work, as a standoff over funding of the FAA continues.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The Federal Aviation Administration has been in a partial shutdown mode since July 22. And Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid says the shutdown will continue, with some 4,000 federal workers remaining on furlough.

"It'll be closed until... maybe not September, maybe more than that," he tells All Things Considered co-host Michele Norris.

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2:03pm

Tue August 2, 2011
The Two-Way

Giffords Staff Member Describes An Emotional Return To The House

The House of Representatives' vote to raise the debt ceiling Monday was upstaged by the surprise appearance of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ), making her first visit to the chamber since being shot in the head in January during a visit to her home state.

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