David Greene

David Greene is a correspondent for NPR News and lays claim to the network's coldest assignment: Moscow.

Greene jumped to NPR's foreign desk recently, after 5 years on the national desk. He took a brief break in between to study intensive Russian at Moscow State University. In January 2010, he returned to reporting. From Moscow, he'll be covering the entire region: Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia.

Greene's voice became familiar to NPR listeners from his four years covering the White House. To report on former President George W. Bush's second term, Greene spent hours in NPR's spacious booth in the basement of the West Wing (it's about the size of your average broom closet). He also spent time trekking across five continents, reporting on White House visits to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, Mongolia, Rwanda, Uruguay – and, of course, Crawford, Texas.

During the days following Hurricane Katrina, Greene was aboard Air Force One when President Bush flew low over the Gulf Coast and caught his first glimpse of the storm's destruction. On the ground in New Orleans, Greene brought listeners a moving interview with the late Ethel Williams, a then-74-year-old flood victim who got an unexpected visit from the president.

Greene was an integral part of NPR's coverage of the historic 2008 election, covering Hillary Clinton's campaign from start to finish, and also focusing on how racial attitudes were playing into voters' decisions. The White House Correspondents Association took special note of Greene's report on a speech by then-candidate Barack Obama, addressing the nation's racial divide. Greene was given the association's 2008 Merriman Smith award for deadline coverage of the presidency.

After President Obama took office, Greene kept one eye trained on the White House and the other eye on the road. He spent three months driving across America – with a recorder, camera and lots of caffeine – to learn how the recession was touching Americans during President Obama's first 100 days in office. The series was called "100 Days: On the Road in Troubled Times."

Greene has also enjoyed guest hosting some of our news programs, including Morning Edition and Weekend Edition. He was in the host's chair when news broke that President Obama had nominated Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court. Greene was in the same chair when comedienne Kathy Griffin yelled at him: "I don't even have the real host today?" she asked. "I got the new guy filling in? Oh, this is so typical."

Before joining NPR in 2005, Greene spent nearly seven years as a newspaper reporter for the Baltimore Sun. He covered the White House during the Bush administration's first term, and wrote about an array of other topics for the paper: Why Oklahomans love the sport of cockfighting, why two Amish men in Pennsylvania were caught trafficking methamphetamine and how one woman brought Christmas back to a small town in Maryland.

Before graduating magna cum laude from Harvard in 1998 with a degree in government, Greene worked as the senior editor on the Harvard Crimson. In 2004, he was named co-volunteer of the year for Coaching for College, a Washington, D.C., program offering tutoring to inner-city youth.

Pages

6:26am

Tue September 13, 2011
Afghanistan

Insurgents Fire On U.S. Embassy In Afghan Capital

Insurgents appear to have launched a coordinated attack in the heart of Afghanistan's capital city. Rocket propelled grenades and assault weapons could be heard across Kabul — targeting the U.S. Embassy and NATO headquarters.

2:00am

Mon September 12, 2011
Analysis

Politics In The News

David Greene talks to NPR's Cokie Roberts about the week in politics.

2:00am

Tue September 6, 2011
Economy

Panel To Take First Steps Toward Deficit Reduction

As Congress returns to work, so do questions about the supercommittee. That's the panel created last month to avert a government default by promising a dramatic deficit reduction plan by Thanksgiving.

10:01pm

Mon August 29, 2011
Crime In The City

Moscow, In A Time Of Fear

Remembering Russia's Dark Past: Tom Rob Smith's crime novels follow Soviet security agent Leo Demidov through 1950s Moscow, when Josef Stalin ruled the Kremlin and simply associating with the wrong people could land you in jail.
And all that Malarkey via Flickr

The novels of Tom Rob Smith are set mostly in the Soviet Union of the 1950s, a time and a place where oppression was palpable and any wrong move could get a person sent to a prison thousands of miles away.

Smith's first thriller, Child 44, was the story of a Soviet security agent whose job was to spy on fellow citizens. While many authors are virtual tour guides in the places where they set their novels, Smith had actually only been to Moscow once before — in 1997, on a high school trip.

Read more

2:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Around the Nation

Not A Monster Storm, But Irene Still Packed A Punch

Hurricane Irene destroyed houses, flooded cities and caused billions of dollars of damage. But the destruction was less than expected because Irene turned out to be less powerful than forecasters predicted.

Pages