David Greene

David Greene is a correspondent for NPR News and lays claim to the network's coldest assignment: Moscow.

Greene jumped to NPR's foreign desk recently, after 5 years on the national desk. He took a brief break in between to study intensive Russian at Moscow State University. In January 2010, he returned to reporting. From Moscow, he'll be covering the entire region: Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia.

Greene's voice became familiar to NPR listeners from his four years covering the White House. To report on former President George W. Bush's second term, Greene spent hours in NPR's spacious booth in the basement of the West Wing (it's about the size of your average broom closet). He also spent time trekking across five continents, reporting on White House visits to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, Mongolia, Rwanda, Uruguay – and, of course, Crawford, Texas.

During the days following Hurricane Katrina, Greene was aboard Air Force One when President Bush flew low over the Gulf Coast and caught his first glimpse of the storm's destruction. On the ground in New Orleans, Greene brought listeners a moving interview with the late Ethel Williams, a then-74-year-old flood victim who got an unexpected visit from the president.

Greene was an integral part of NPR's coverage of the historic 2008 election, covering Hillary Clinton's campaign from start to finish, and also focusing on how racial attitudes were playing into voters' decisions. The White House Correspondents Association took special note of Greene's report on a speech by then-candidate Barack Obama, addressing the nation's racial divide. Greene was given the association's 2008 Merriman Smith award for deadline coverage of the presidency.

After President Obama took office, Greene kept one eye trained on the White House and the other eye on the road. He spent three months driving across America – with a recorder, camera and lots of caffeine – to learn how the recession was touching Americans during President Obama's first 100 days in office. The series was called "100 Days: On the Road in Troubled Times."

Greene has also enjoyed guest hosting some of our news programs, including Morning Edition and Weekend Edition. He was in the host's chair when news broke that President Obama had nominated Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court. Greene was in the same chair when comedienne Kathy Griffin yelled at him: "I don't even have the real host today?" she asked. "I got the new guy filling in? Oh, this is so typical."

Before joining NPR in 2005, Greene spent nearly seven years as a newspaper reporter for the Baltimore Sun. He covered the White House during the Bush administration's first term, and wrote about an array of other topics for the paper: Why Oklahomans love the sport of cockfighting, why two Amish men in Pennsylvania were caught trafficking methamphetamine and how one woman brought Christmas back to a small town in Maryland.

Before graduating magna cum laude from Harvard in 1998 with a degree in government, Greene worked as the senior editor on the Harvard Crimson. In 2004, he was named co-volunteer of the year for Coaching for College, a Washington, D.C., program offering tutoring to inner-city youth.

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8:29am

Thu August 18, 2011
Middle East

Obama Calls For Syria's President To Resign

Originally published on Thu August 18, 2011 8:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host:

President Obama today released a written statement calling for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to resign. In his statement, President Obama condemned, quote, "the disgraceful attacks on Syrian civilians." Secretary of State Hillary Clinton echoed that call in an announcement from the State Department.

Secretary HILLARY CLINTON (State Department): Assad is standing in their way. For the sake of the Syrian people, the time has come for him to step aside and leave this transition to the Syrians themselves.

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3:00am

Tue August 16, 2011
Race To The Arctic

Russia Pushes To Claim Arctic As Its Own

Murmansk, Russia, is the largest city above the Arctic Circle. If Russia follows through with plans to explore for oil and natural gas offshore in the Arctic Ocean, the city and its port could see significant economic benefits.
David Greene NPR

Four years ago, Russian researchers made a bold, if unseen, move. From a submarine, deep beneath the icy waters of the North Pole, they planted a Russian flag on the ocean floor.

Russia has the world's longest Arctic border, which stretches more than 10,000 miles. And for Russia, that 2007 research mission was only the beginning of a major drive to claim ownership of vast portions of the Arctic, as well as the oil and gas deposits that are beneath.

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4:08pm

Wed July 20, 2011
The Two-Way

Photo Of The Day: Interviewing Reindeer In Arctic Russia

David Greene landed this interview at a reindeer farm near Murmansk, Russia.
David Greene NPR

NPR reporters are traveling the far North to report for an upcoming series on the thawing Arctic and what that's going to mean to nations in the region. Click here to see their dispatches. NPR's Moscow correspondent David Greene sent this curious photograph:

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5:20pm

Mon July 18, 2011
The Two-Way

A Postcard From Arctic Russia

NPR

A group of NPR reporters are in different parts of the Arctic doing some reporting for an upcoming series on the thawing Arctic and what it's going to mean to nations in the region. NPR's Moscow correspondent David Greene sent us a few graphs and a couple of pictures:

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12:01am

Fri July 15, 2011
The End Of The Space Shuttle Era

In Russia, Space Ride For U.S. Spurs Nostalgia, Hope

Crew members of the International Space Station, (from left) U.S. astronaut Ron Garan, Russian cosmonauts Alexander Samokytyaev and Andrei Borisenko, prepare to enter a Soyuz simulator outside Moscow on March 30, 2011. With the space shuttle out of commission, the Russian Soyuz vehicle will be the only way for Americans to reach space.
Dimitry Kostyukov AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. shuttle program will end after space shuttle Atlantis returns to Earth on July 21. Retired NASA astronaut Leroy Chiao captured this reality on All Things Considered:

"After this mission, we will no longer have the ability to send American astronauts into space ourselves," Chiao said. "And arguably, we will no longer be the leaders in human space flight until we get that capability back."

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