Jeff Brady

Jeff Brady is based in Denver where he files reports on the energy industry as well as Western issues, politics and culture. He travels the country for NPR and spent many months covering the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

In 2006, Brady's reporting helped restart a federal car-titling system that had long been stymied by business interests. Once fully implemented, the Department of Justice estimates the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTS) will save U.S. car buyers up to $11 billion a year.

Before coming to NPR in September 2003, Brady was a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) in Portland. He's also worked in commercial television as an anchor and a reporter; and commercial radio as a talk-show host and reporter.

Brady discovered NPR in the late 1980s while running his small grocery store in Southern Oregon. "Customers often wanted to discuss current events. It was interesting, but I didn't know much. So I started reading the paper and listening to NPR to learn more," says Brady.

In 1989, he volunteered at the local NPR member station, Jefferson Public Radio, answering phones during a pledge drive and then running errands for the office staff until they let him in the newsroom.

Brady graduated from Southern Oregon State College (now Southern Oregon University) in 1995 and has worked as a journalist since then.

If there’s a specific story you think Brady should consider covering, he can be reached on Facebook and Twitter, where he regularly posts stories related to his beats.

 

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4:36am

Sun February 10, 2013
Around the Nation

Residents Begin Cleanup After Massive Snowstorm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. New England is digging out from as much as three feet of snowfall today, and at least five deaths have been blamed on a powerful winter storm that swept through the region Friday night and yesterday morning. The snow has stopped falling, but more than half a million people still don't have electricity. And in some coastal areas, residents are also dealing with flooding. NPR's Jeff Brady visited the small town of Scituate, Massachusetts.

(SOUNDBITE OF WAVES CRASHING)

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3:05pm

Sat February 9, 2013
U.S.

Crews Clean Up Northeast Blizzard

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 4:51 pm

As crews dig out from a record-breaking snow storm in New England, there are new worries about flooding. The National Weather Service reported waves three stories high off the coast. NPR's Jeff Brady reports from Boston.

3:52am

Sun January 27, 2013
Energy

Focus On Fracking Diverts Attention From Horizontal Drilling

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:00 am

Opponents of fracking demonstrate during the Winter X Games 2012 in Aspen, Colo.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Mention the recent surge in oil and natural gas production in the U.S. and one word comes to mind for a lot of people: "fracking." Hydraulic fracturing is a controversial technique that uses water, sand and potentially hazardous chemicals to break up rock deep underground to release oil and natural gas.

But there's another technology that is just as responsible for drilling booms happening across the country: horizontal drilling.

Environmental Consequences

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2:54pm

Thu January 24, 2013
Energy

Will Obama Administration Clear Keystone XL Pipeline?

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 3:06 pm

TransCanada already has begun construction on a southern section of the Keystone XL pipeline. Since it doesn't cross the U.S.-Canadian border, it doesn't require approval from the State Department and President Obama.
Sarah A. Miller AP

The future of the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline is in the hands of the State Department. President Obama rejected a similar pipeline proposal last year, but now that Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman has approved an alternative route through his state, the approval process is back on track.

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4:00pm

Wed January 16, 2013
Politics

Interior Secretary's Legacy Defined By Issues Of Oil

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:16 am

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar speaks at the dedication for the Southwest's first urban wildlife refuge on the southern edge of Albuquerque, N.M., on Sept. 27, 2012. Salazar has announced that he'll leave his post in late March and return to Colorado.
Susan Montoya Bryan AP

The Department of the Interior is huge — more than 70,000 employees manage a half-billion acres of public land, mostly in the West. The department does everything from operate national parks to administer Native American social programs and manage wild horses.

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