Jennifer Ludden

Jennifer Ludden is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. She covers a range of stories on family life and social issues.

In recent years, Ludden has reported on the changing economics of marriage, the changing face of retirement as the baby boomers enter old age, and the ethical challenges of modern reproductive technology.

Ludden helped cover national security after the 9/11 attacks, then reported on the Bush administration's crackdown on illegal immigrants as well as Congressional efforts to pass a sweeping legalization. She traveled to the Philippines for a story on how an overburdened immigration bureaucracy keeps families separated for years, and to El Salvador to profile migrants who had been deported or turned back at the border.

Prior to moving into her current assignment in 2002, Ludden spent six years as a foreign reporter for NPR covering the Middle East, Europe, and West and Central Africa. She followed the collapse of the decade-long Oslo peace process, shared in two awards (Overseas Press Club and Society of Professional Journalists) for NPR's coverage of the Kosovo war in 1999, and won the Robert F. Kennedy award for her coverage of the overthrow of Mobutu Sese Seko in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

When not navigating war zones, Ludden reported on cultural trends, including the dying tradition of storytellers in Syria, the emergence of Persian pop music in Iran, and the rise of a new form of urban polygamy in Africa.

Before joining NPR in 1995, Ludden reported in Canada, and at public radio stations in Boston and Maine.

Ludden graduated from Syracuse University in 1988 with a bachelor's degree in English and Television, Radio and Film Production.

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12:01am

Tue May 31, 2011
Making Babies: 21st Century Families

Egg Freezing Puts The Biological Clock On Hold

Robyn Ross and Mark Cohen with their baby, Camden, who's here thanks to eggs Robyn froze several years ago when she was single.
Marisa Penaloza NPR

This story is part of an occasional series.

As more women postpone motherhood into their 30s, even 40s, they're hitting that age-old constraint: the biological clock. Now, technology is dangling the possibility that women can stop that clock, at least for a while.

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12:01am

Tue May 31, 2011
Making Babies: 21st Century Families

Nudging Young Women To Think About Fertility

iStockphoto.com

Since 2004, when Christy Jones launched Extend Fertility, the first U.S. company to market egg freezing as a lifestyle choice, thousands have contacted her and hundreds have undergone the procedure. But there's a troublesome disconnect.

The average age of those inquiring is 34 1/2, an ideal time to put one's biological clock on hold. But the average age of the women who actually freeze their eggs is 37 1/2, the upper edge of the recommended range.

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10:12am

Mon May 30, 2011
NPR Story

Study: Revamp Workday To Combat Obesity Problem

A new study suggests that efforts to address the obesity epidemic should include dramatically changing the workday. Some are already dong so, using treadmill desks at work to burn calories. And in Portland, Ore., city officials are trying to get desk-bound workers up and about.

6:16am

Mon May 30, 2011
Health

Obesity And The Workplace

A new study links rising rates of obesity to the increasingly sedentary workplace.

5:46pm

Mon May 23, 2011
Around the Nation

As Seniors Increase, A Push To Make Streets Safer

Cities like Charlotte, N.C., are moving to improve roadways for pedestrians and cyclists. Above, a street project on Rozzelles Ferry Road, which now has bike lanes and extended sidewalks. Below, an aerial photo of the intersection before work began.
National Complete Streets Coalition

America is aging — a fact that advocates are pushing Congress to consider as it takes up a new transportation bill. Their goal is more safety for older Americans, on both roads and sidewalks.

Pedestrians and cyclists are already far more likely to be hit by cars in the United States than those in some European cities. Add to that the coming tide of older Americans who use walking canes and wheelchairs, and some warn that a road safety crisis looms.

Countdown: Crossing A Busy Street

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