Kirk Siegler

Reporter

Kirk Siegler reports for NPR, based out of NPR West in California.

Siegler grew up near Missoula, MT, and received a B.A. in journalism from the University of Colorado.  He’s an avid skier and traveler in his spare time.

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2:05pm

Tue April 19, 2011
Environment

NREL Partnering with Google to Promote Electric Cars

Photo courtesy of Creative Commons

The Golden-based National Renewable Energy Lab is partnering with internet search engine Google to promote the spread of electric car charging stations in Colorado and across the US. 

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3:28pm

Mon April 18, 2011
Education

School Funding Bill Cuts Could Get Pared Down in House

Creative Commons

Lawmakers in the state house are beginning debate this week on a school funding bill that’s already cleared the Senate and includes some $250 million in cuts to K-12 education.

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9:09am

Mon April 18, 2011
Environment

Report Warns of Pollution Near Parks, Monuments

A controversial mining law is putting many western national parks at risk of environmental pollution.  That’s according to a new study by the Pew Environment Group which says the 1872 Hard Rock Mining law has led to a spike in mining claims near national parks. 

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1:42pm

Fri April 15, 2011
Politics

Tea Party Groups Rally at Colorado Capitol

Photo by Kirk Siegler

Even though taxes aren’t actually due until Monday, a couple hundred Tea Party activists descended on the state capitol Friday to mark the traditional tax filing day with a renewed call for limited government.

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5:33pm

Thu April 14, 2011
Environment

Colorado Roadless Plan Scrutinized

Colorado has just over four million acres of roadless National Forest lands.
Photo by Kirk Siegler

A five year saga over how to manage roadless National Forest lands in Colorado has taken its latest turn, now that state and federal forest officials have unveiled Colorado’s draft roadless rule.  The proposal calls for “upper tier” protections for a half million acres of roadless forests in the state, and less-strong road-building bans on the remaining three and a half million acres.  But KUNC’s Kirk Siegler reports the draft rule is not without controversy.

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