Korva Coleman

In her work as an NPR newscaster, Korva Coleman is responsible for writing, producing, and delivering national newscasts for NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. She is also a substitute host for Talk of the Nation, Weekend All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition Sunday with Liane Hansen.

Before joining NPR in March 1990, Coleman was a staff reporter and copy editor for the Washington Afro-American newspaper. She also produced and hosted First Edition, an overnight news program at NPR's member station WAMU-FM/Washington, DC.

Originally from Arizona, Coleman worked in commercial radio as news and public affairs directors at stations in Phoenix and Tucson. Her awards include Arizona Associated Press Awards for best radio newscast, editorial, and short feature. She was also nominated for Outstanding Young Woman of America in 1983.

Coleman earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Howard University in 1989 and studied law at Georgetown University Law Center from 1989 to 1990.

 

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6:17am

Thu October 18, 2012

6:26am

Wed October 17, 2012

6:12am

Fri October 12, 2012

9:40am

Thu October 11, 2012
The Two-Way

Motorists Beware! Zombies Ahead!

A Portland, Maine road sign is changed to a zombie warning on Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012. It originally read "Night work 8 pm-6 am. Expect delays."
Jeff Peterson AP

Unsuspecting motorists got either a shiver or a laugh yesterday morning in Portland, Maine as they drove by a construction site whose warning sign had been hacked: instead of the typical caution, they were told 'Warning Zombies Ahead!'

Portland authorities are not amused.

"These (signs) are deployed and used as a safety precaution. They're not a toy," Portland spokeswoman Nicole Clegg told the Portland Press Herald. She says the prank is a crime.

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7:55am

Thu October 11, 2012
The Two-Way

U.S. Foreclosures Drop Dramatically, But The Picture Remains Very Mixed

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 8:38 am

An auction sign in front of a Salem, Ore., home on Feb. 23.
Rick Bowmer AP

RealtyTrac, an online industry group that follows the foreclosure market, says the number of foreclosed properties nationally dropped dramatically in September, down by seven percent from August. And the firm says since September 2011, foreclosures are down 16 percent — that's the lowest total since July 2007.

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