Linda Holmes

Linda Holmes writes and edits NPR's entertainment and pop-culture blog, Monkey See. She has several elaborate theories involving pop culture and monkeys, all of which are available on request.

Linda began her professional life as an attorney. In time, however, her affection for writing, popular culture and the online universe eclipsed her legal ambitions. She shoved her law degree in the back of the closet, gave its living-room space to DVD sets of The Wire and never looked back.

Linda was a writer and editor at Television Without Pity, where she recapped several hundred hours of programming — including both High School Musical movies, for which she did not receive hazard pay. Since 2003, she has been a contributor to MSNBC.com, where she has written about books, movies, television and pop-culture miscellany.

Linda's work has also appeared on Vulture (New York magazine's entertainment blog), in TV Guide and in many, many legal documents.

Linda lives in Takoma Park, Md., where she devotes herself to her nephews, her scruffy friends and perfecting her recipe for iced coffee.

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6:12am

Sat April 19, 2014
Movie Reviews

'Say Anything,' Still Full Of Guileless Affection

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 9:40 am

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

You're listening to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. Twenty-five years ago, Lloyd Dobler raised a boombox over his head and changed the world of movie boyfriends forever.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "IN YOUR EYES")

PETER GABRIEL: (Singing) All my instincts, they return.

GOODWYN: Linda Holmes of our pop culture blog "Monkey See" was a teenager when she first saw the film "Say Anything..." She says all these years later, she has a new appreciation of it.

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5:21am

Fri April 18, 2014
Monkey See

Tatiana Maslany On Looking Herself In The Eye

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 9:10 am

Tatiana Maslany plays Sarah, as well as some other characters, on BBC America's Orphan Black.
Steve Wilkie BBC America

Tatiana Maslany plays Sarah — and some other people — on BBC America's sci-fi show Orphan Black. On Friday's Morning Edition, she speaks to Kelly McEvers about how she manages to play all those different women from different cultural backgrounds, not to mention women with different mixes of malevolence and likability. Technically, it's no picnic: Just ask the tennis ball that sometimes plays her head.

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11:36pm

Sun March 2, 2014
The Oscars

Oscars 2014: Low On Laughs, But A Great Speech Or Two

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 6:26 am

At Sunday's Oscar ceremony, the feel-good win of the night came when 12 Years a Slave star Lupita Nyong'o took home the supporting-actress trophy.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

The big winner was 12 Years a Slave, but there was quite a bit of love to go around at Sunday night's Oscars. What there wasn't, as usual, was a lot of riveting television.

Sure, there was John Travolta squinting at the teleprompter and introducing Idina Menzel (to sing the Oscar-winning Best Original Song "Let It Go," from Frozen) as — no kidding — "Adele Dazeem." And there was a fun dance number featuring Pharrell Williams and his own Oscar-nominated "Happy," which he wore a formal black version of his Grammys hat to perform.

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2:31pm

Mon September 9, 2013
Arts & Life

A Toronto Film Chat, From Two Jake Gyllenhaals To Three Daniel Radcliffes

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:20 pm

Jesse Eisenberg stars in The Double, which is screening at the Toronto International Film Festival.
Toronto International Film Festival

Bob Mondello and I took a break from our time at the Toronto International Film Festival today for a chat withAll Things Consideredand host Audie Cornish. We filled her in on just how many movies we've both seen, the surplus of stories about doppelgangers, the adventures of Daniel Radcliffe, and what we think are the early awards contenders.

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6:19am

Thu May 30, 2013
Monkey See

As Trailers Eat Up Movie Time, Theaters And Studios Squabble Over Shortening Them

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 12:18 am

iStockphoto.com

Here's a question: If you go to the movies and the scheduled showtime is, say, 7:30, when do you actually expect the movie to start? If you said 7:30, you go to very unusual screenings. If you said 7:45, you're closer to what many experience. If you said 7:50, you're still in range: There's often some advertising other than trailers, the limit for trailer length is 2 1/2 minutes, and theaters sometimes run seven or eight trailers. Eight would add up to 20 minutes.

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