Marilyn Geewax

Marilyn Geewax is the senior business editor for NPR's National Desk. Besides assigning and editing business stories, Geewax regularly discusses economic issues on Weekend Edition Sunday.

Geewax was previously the national economics correspondent for Cox Newspapers' Washington Bureau. Before coming to Washington in 1999, she worked for the Cox flagship paper, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, first as a business reporter and then as a columnist and editorial board member. She has also reported for the Akron Beacon Journal.

In 2004, Geewax earned a master's degree at Georgetown University, where she focused on international economic affairs. During 1994-1995, she studied economics and international relations at Harvard as a Nieman Fellow. She was also a Davenport Fellow at the University of Missouri, and earned a bachelor's degree in journalism from The Ohio State University.

From 2001 to 2006, Geewax taught a business journalism class as an adjunct professor at George Washington University.

Pages

6:45am

Sun March 27, 2011
Crisis In The Housing Market

Pursuing The American Dream, By Renting

The start of spring usually brings a surge in existing-home sales and housing starts.

But this year, warming temperatures may not be enough to pull the real estate market out of a deep freeze. New homes sales plunged 16.9 percent last month, while the median price slid nearly 14 percent to $202,100, the lowest level since December 2003, according to the Commerce Department.

Read more

7:09pm

Sat March 5, 2011
Economy

Raising The Retirement Age: Can It Balance Budgets?

As state and federal lawmakers search for ways to reduce government spending, some economists are urging them to raise the retirement age to ease budget pressures.

If Americans were to work longer, they would pay more in taxes, and at the same time reduce the cost of government pensions and Social Security benefits, according to these economists.

But others disagree. They say the fast-moving 21st century economy doesn't need older workers as much as it needs young workers with the latest job skills.

Read more

Pages