Mark Memmott

Mark Memmott joined NPR News in the spring of 2009 to launch a new blog, "The Two-Way," with co-blogger Frank James.

"The Two-Way" is the place where NPR.org gives readers breaking news and analysis — and where it engages users in conversations ("two-ways") about the most compelling stories being reported by NPR News and other news media.

Memmott came to NPR from USA Today, where for over 20 years he worked as a reporter and editor on subjects ranging from politics and, foreign affairs to economics and the media.

In recent years he helped launch and then led three different news blogs at USATODAY.com, including the website's 2008 presidential campaign blog, On Politics.

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6:10am

Wed September 14, 2011
The Two-Way

Release Of American Hikers Not Imminent, Iran's Judiciary Says

The limits of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's authority appear to be showing again with word from that country's official news outlet that:

"Iran's Judiciary has rejected recent media reports on the imminent release of the two American nationals that were convicted of spying on behalf of the United States."

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5:55am

Wed September 14, 2011
The Two-Way

Democrats Suffer 'Demoralizing' Defeats In New York And Nevada

"Republicans pulled off an upset in Tuesday's special election in New York City to replace former congressman Anthony Weiner," NPR's Joel Rose reports. "Bob Turner claimed victory over Democrat David Weprin."

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5:30am

Wed September 14, 2011
The Two-Way

Inside Kabul Siege Site:Attackers' Bodies, Walls Riddled With Bullet Holes

Afghan Security personnel stand above the body of one attacker, on the 10th floor of the building in Kabul from which RPGs and other weapons were fired.
David Gilkey NPR

An attack on the U.S. embassy and other buildings in the heart of Kabul's diplomatic district that lasted 20 hours is now over.

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2:15pm

Tue September 13, 2011
The Two-Way

What A Year: Disasters Have Been Declared In All But Two States

Volunteer firefighter Jason Collard at a wildfire in Strawn, Texas, in April.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

Partisans on both sides continue to argue over whether to put more money into the coffers of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which is running short of cash because there have been so many tornadoes, hurricanes, floods and other natural disasters this year.

The political bickering is nothing new, of course.

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10:50am

Tue September 13, 2011
The Two-Way

Al-Qaida Is Weakened, But Remains A 'Serious Threat,' Petraeus Says

CIA Director David Petraeus (right) and Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testifying earlier today (Sept. 13, 2011).
Mark Wilson Getty Images

"The CIA assesses that, 10 years after the 9/11 attacks, the United States continues to face a serious threat from al-Qaida and its worldwide network of affiliates and sympathizers," even though the terrorist organization "has been weakened," CIA Director David Petraeus told Congress today in his first testimony since taking over the top job at the intelligence agency.

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