Mark Memmott

Mark Memmott joined NPR News in the spring of 2009 to launch a new blog, "The Two-Way," with co-blogger Frank James.

"The Two-Way" is the place where NPR.org gives readers breaking news and analysis — and where it engages users in conversations ("two-ways") about the most compelling stories being reported by NPR News and other news media.

Memmott came to NPR from USA Today, where for over 20 years he worked as a reporter and editor on subjects ranging from politics and, foreign affairs to economics and the media.

In recent years he helped launch and then led three different news blogs at USATODAY.com, including the website's 2008 presidential campaign blog, On Politics.

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9:50am

Fri April 8, 2011
The Two-Way

So Sad: Teen Dies In Car Crash On Road Named For His Dad

This story from South Carolina may break your heart:

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9:30am

Fri April 8, 2011
The Two-Way

AP: U.S. Still Holding Terror Suspects For Weeks In Secret Afghan Jails

This exclusive moved on the Associated Press wire this morning:

" 'Black sites,' the secret network of jails that grew up after the Sept. 11 attacks, are gone. But suspected terrorists are still being held under hazy circumstances with uncertain rights in secret, military-run jails across Afghanistan, where they can be interrogated for weeks without charge, according to U.S. officials who revealed details of the top-secret network to The Associated Press."

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9:15am

Fri April 8, 2011
The Two-Way

How Did Wisconsin Miss 14,000 Votes? Someone Didn't Click 'Save'

It was certainly a shocker, as our colleague Frank James says over at It's All Politics, when it was announced Thursday that what was thought to be a skintight race for a Wisconsin Supreme Court seat was instead looking like an easy win for the incumbent Republican.

So what happened to turn what was a 204-vote lead for Democrat JoAnne Kloppenberg into a 7,500-plus votes advantage for Justice David Prosser, a Republican?

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8:35am

Fri April 8, 2011
The Two-Way

Whistleblower Gets $4.5 Million Award From IRS

The Internal Revenue Service has awarded a Pennsylvania accountant $4.5 million because he blew the whistle on his own employer — an act that "netted the IRS $20 million in taxes and interest," The Associated Press reports.

According to the AP, "the accountant filed a complaint with the IRS in 2007, just as the IRS Whistleblower Office opened, but heard nothing for two years." So he hired a lawyer to help push the case. That lawyer, Eric Young of Blue Bell, Pa., declines to identify his client or the company he worked for.

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8:05am

Fri April 8, 2011
The Two-Way

Cars, Houses, Human Remains: Debris From Japan Is Headed Toward U.S.

The stories keep coming about what could be some grisly and disturbing discoveries along the coasts of Hawaii and the western U.S. for the next several years.

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