Renee Montagne

Renee Montagne is co-host of NPR's Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the U.S. She has hosted the newsmagazine since 2004, broadcasting from NPR West in Culver City, California, with co-host Steve Inskeep in NPR's Washington, D.C. headquarters.

Montagne is a familiar voice on NPR, having reported and hosted since the mid-1980s. She hosted All Things Considered with Robert Siegel for two years in the late 1980s, and previously worked for NPR's Science, National and Foreign desks.

Over the years, Montagne has done thousands of interviews on a wide range of topics: Kurt Vonnegut on how he transformed surviving the WWII firebombing of Dresden into the novel Slaughterhouse Five; National Guardsmen on how they handle the holidays in Iraq; a Hollywood historian on how the famous hillside sign came to be; Toni Morrison on the dreams and memories she turned into novels; and Bud Montagne, Renee's father, remembering the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Montagne traveled to Greenwich, England, in May 2007 to kick off the yearlong series, "Climate Connections," in which NPR partnered with National Geographic to chronicle how people are changing the Earth's climate and how the climate is impacting people. From the prime meridian, she laid out the journey that would take listeners to Africa, New Orleans and the Antarctic.

Since 9-11, Montagne has gone to Afghanistan five times, traveling throughout the country and interviewing farmers and mullahs, women and poll workers, the president and an infamous warlord. She spent a month during the summer of 2009 reporting on the Afghanistan politics and election. She has produced three series: 2002's "Recreating Afghanistan"; 2004's "Afghanistan Votes"; and 2006's "The War: Five Years On."

In the spring of 2005, Montagne took Morning Edition to Rome for the funeral of Pope John Paul ll. She co-anchored from Vatican City during a historic week when millions of pilgrims and virtually every world leader descended on the Vatican.

In 1990, Montagne traveled to South Africa to cover Nelson Mandela's release from prison, and continued to report from South Africa for three years. In 1994, she and a team of NPR reporters won a prestigious Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for coverage of South Africa's historic presidential and parliamentary elections.

Through most of the 1980s, Montagne was based in New York, working as an independent producer and reporter for both NPR and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Prior to that, she worked as a reporter/editor for Pacific News Service in San Francisco. She began her career as news director of the city's community radio station, KPOO, while still at university.

In addition to the duPont Columbia Award, Montagne has been honored by the Overseas Press Club for her coverage of Afghanistan, and by the National Association of Black Journalists for a series on Black musicians going to war in the 20th century.

Montagne, the daughter of a Marine Corps family, was born in California and spent much of her childhood in Hawaii and Arizona. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, as a Phi Beta Kappa. Her career includes serving as a fellow at the University of Southern California with the National Arts Journalism Program, and teaching broadcast writing at New York University's Graduate Department of Journalism.

Pages

2:00am

Fri October 7, 2011
Asia

Pakistani Doctor Who Helped CIA May Face Treason Trial

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 8:55 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, host: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. Steve Inskeep is away.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: And I'm Renee Montagne.

When the U.S. tracked down and killed Osama bin Laden in his hiding place in northwest Pakistan, it chose to keep the Pakistani army and its intelligence service in the dark about that mission. The fact that Pakistan was caught with the world's most wanted man living within walking distance of a premiere military academy humiliated and angered many in the country.

Read more

2:00am

Fri October 7, 2011
World

Nobel Peace Prize Announcement

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 8:55 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, host: This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: And I'm Renee Montagne. The winner - or should I say the winners - of the Nobel Peace Prize were unveiled in Oslo earlier this morning. The announcement was made by the chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee.

THJORBORN JAGLAND: The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2011 is to be divided in three equal parts between Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee and Tawakul Karman.

Read more

11:15am

Thu October 6, 2011
Economy

Obama To Congress: Make Jobs Proposal Top Priority

Originally published on Thu October 6, 2011 10:19 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

President Obama sought this morning to put his proposal to create American jobs at the top of Congress' to-do list. The president has traveled the country in recent weeks, trying to rally public support for his $447 billion plan. And today, he held a press conference at the White House.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: And the reason I keep going around the country talking about this jobs bill is because people really need help right now. Our economy really needs a jolt right now.

Read more

2:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
Europe

Greek Public Sector Workers Strike Over Austerity Measures

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 3:28 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. Steve Inskeep is away.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

We're going to hear now about the continuing economic woes of Greece. It's one of the small European Union countries drowning in debt. Today it faces yet another protest. This time, a general strike by workers in the public sector furious about more cuts aimed at them. The pressure to shrink the government payroll is coming from international creditors.

Read more

2:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
Sports

NBA Labor Talks Break Down

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 3:28 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

National Basketball Association players and owners are not any closer to settling their labor dispute. With the season scheduled to begin on November 1st, there's a real chance regular season games could be lost. After yesterday's talks ended without much success, league commissioner David Stern officially cancelled the remainder of the preseason. Joining us for more on this dispute is NPR's Mike Pesca.

Good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

Read more

Pages