Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He was a fixture on the campaign trail throughout 2008, traveling extensively with Senator John McCain to cover the Arizona senator's bid for the presidency.

Horsley comes to the White House beat from the west coast, where he covered the economy and energy as NPR's San Diego-based business correspondent. He also helped cover the 2004 presidential campaign, and reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis. He also worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. He began his professional career in 1987 as a production assistant for NPR in Washington.

Born and raised in Denver, Colorado, Horsley received a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

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12:01am

Tue June 21, 2011
Politics

In 2012 GOP Race, Climate Policy Is A Non-Issue

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman addresses the Faith and Freedom Coalition in Washington, D.C. In the upcoming Republican primaries, limits on carbon emissions — which Huntsman once supported — are not expected to be a pivotal issue.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman formally kicks off his presidential campaign Tuesday, with New York's Statue of Liberty as a backdrop. He's hoping some tired and poor Republicans are yearning for a different kind of candidate. Huntsman holds moderate views on immigration and same-sex civil unions, and he wasn't afraid to serve in the Obama administration, as U.S. ambassador to China.

As governor, Huntsman was also a leader in a regional effort to control greenhouse gases, by capping carbon emissions and trading pollution permits.

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12:01am

Tue June 14, 2011
Politics

More Burger Tests: Good For Health But Too Costly?

Authorities in Europe are trying to pin down the cause of a widespread and deadly outbreak of food poisoning. In the U.S., the Obama Administration is wrestling with a proposal to screen hamburger for additional varieties of deadly E.coli bacteria.

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12:01am

Tue June 7, 2011
Politics

Ten Years of Bush Tax Cuts

Later this week, Vice President Biden will host another meeting with Republican and Democratic lawmakers, looking for ways to reduce the federal budget deficit.

The red ink they'll be discussing reflects both government spending and deliberate moves to reduce taxes, including a major round of cuts signed into law by President George W. Bush ten years ago Tuesday.

The signing ceremony was originally going to be outdoors, on the South Lawn of the White House, but rain forced a hasty relocation to the East Room.

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12:01am

Thu June 2, 2011
Politics

Treasury: Debt Default Would Be 'Catastrophic'

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner travels to Capitol Hill on Thursday with a warning for freshmen lawmakers: They must vote to increase the government's credit limit or risk an economic catastrophe.

Earlier this week, the House voted overwhelmingly against such an increase. Some lawmakers believe the government can leave the debt ceiling unchanged and still avoid dire consequences.

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4:00am

Fri May 27, 2011
NPR Story

Obama To Push For Aid To Egypt, Tunisia

Leaders of Egypt and Tunisia — two emerging democracies — will join President Obama and the other seven world leaders meeting at the G8 summit in France Friday. They'll take part in a discussion on how the world's leading economies can help promote democratic transformation across the Middle East and North Africa.

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