Steve Zind

Steve has been with VPR since 1994, first serving as host of VPR’s public affairs program and then as a reporter, based in Central Vermont. Many VPR listeners recognize Steve for his special reports from Iran, providing a glimpse of this country that is usually hidden from the rest of the world. Prior to working with VPR, Steve served as program director for WNCS for 17 years, and also worked as news director for WCVR in Randolph. A graduate of Northern Arizona University, Steve also worked for stations in Phoenix and Tucson before moving to Vermont in 1972. Steve was honored in 2007 with two national Edward R. Murrow Awards for his reporting on VPR.

2:52pm

Tue January 28, 2014
Shots - Health News

In Vermont, A Network Of Help For Opiate-Addicted Mothers

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 8:44 am

As Vermont expands addiction treatment services, it is also coming to grips with one of the most difficult and emotional aspects of the problem: pregnant women addicted to opiates.
iStockphoto

It came as a surprise to many people when Vermont's governor recently devoted his entire 2014 State of the State address to what he called a "full-blown heroin crisis."

While it may not fit Vermont's bucolic image, the state's addiction problem has long been acknowledged. And as the state has expanded treatment, it's also been coming to grips with one of the most difficult and emotional aspects of the issue: addicted mothers.

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2:59am

Wed August 28, 2013
Around the Nation

Two Years Later, Irene Haunts Vermonters

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 10:33 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, just as fires are a fact of life in the West, hurricanes smash into the Southeast every summer. But New England is something of a stranger to summer disasters, which is why it was huge news two years ago today when Irene hit Vermont. That tropical storm displaced 1,400 families.

Vermont Public Radio's Steve Zind has the story.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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3:09am

Sat February 9, 2013
Economy

For Rural Towns, Postal Service Cuts Could Mean A Loss Of Identity

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 10:11 am

Brookfield, Vt., residents fear that Postal Service changes will eventually lead to the closing of their small town post office. About 1,300 people live in Brookfield, according to 2010 U.S. Census figures.
Steve Zind Vermont Public Radio

In rural Vermont, the U.S. Postal Service decision to discontinue Saturday letter delivery is yet another blow to an institution that's long been a fixture of village life.

Last year, the U.S. Postal Service abandoned plans to close thousands of small post offices, opting instead to cut hours. But there are fears the cuts will continue until the rural post office is no more.

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