Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith joined NPR in 2009 as NPR's newest business reporter. Her coverage spans the business world, from the latest trends in housing and consumer spending to new developments in the ongoing financial crisis. In her work, Keith aspires to "make business stories relatable to all our listeners, not just those who read the Wall Street Journal." In early 2010, she was one of NPR's reporters on the ground in Haiti covering the aftermath of the country's disasterous earthquake.

Keith has covered the major stories of the global recession, including developments in housing and banking, as well as everyday business stories for national and local public radio news outlets. Over the course of her career, she has covered other major news events including wildfires in California and the coal ash spill in Tennessee.

Keith has deep roots in public radio, and got her start in news by writing and voicing essays for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday as a teenager. After earning her a journalism graduate degree from the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley (where it was reported she was the youngest person to ever enroll), she went to work for NPR station KQED's California Report, where she covered topics including agriculture and the environment. She then went east to WOSU-AM in Columbus, Ohio, where she reported on politics and the 2004 presidential campaign. Then it was back to her home state of California where she reported again for KQED and KPCC/Southern California Public Radio. Tamara also refined her business reporting skills through work with American Public Media's Marketplace.

She is the recipient of numerous awards, including a first place trophy from the Society of Environmental Journalists for "Outstanding Story Radio."

In her spare time, she hosts and produces "B-Side Radio," an hour-long public radio magazine and podcast.

She is a recreational triathlete and half-marathon runner. Her husband is a cancer researcher and veterinarian.

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4:28pm

Wed March 30, 2011
Planet Money

What's Next: Life After Fannie And Freddie

This is part three in our series on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Read part one, "Kill Them, Bury Them," and part two, "Self-Fulfilling Prophecy."

It's now clear that mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were a bum deal for taxpayers.

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6:00pm

Tue March 29, 2011
Crisis In The Housing Market

Mortgage Rule Raises Doubts For Banks, Borrowers

Regulators took a big step Tuesday in reshaping the nation's mortgage market. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. introduced a new rule that aims to rein in the excesses that inflated the housing bubble.

At the height of the bubble, lenders made a lot of really questionable mortgages. But the companies that wrote the loans didn't have to worry about poor quality, because they were just going to sell them off someone else.

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3:29pm

Wed March 16, 2011
The Road Back To Work

For The Long-Term Unemployed, The Hunt Continues

Part of an ongoing series

The government has a name for the 6 million Americans who have been unemployed for six months or longer: the long-term unemployed. And for many, the longer they're out of work, the harder it is to get back in.

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12:01am

Thu March 10, 2011
Business

Bank's Home Loan Modification Reduces Principal

Bank of America is announcing on Thursday a loan modification program to help military service members who are behind on their mortgages. What's unique about the program is that the bank is offering to reduce the principal owed on the loans instead of just adjusting the interest rate.

There is already a law designed to protect military personnel from financial stress. It bans foreclosures and reduces interest rates while they're on active duty.

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4:00am

Fri March 4, 2011
Economy

Missouri May Reject Extending Jobless Benefits

In Missouri, the state legislature is considering turning down money from the federal government to extend benefits for the state's unemployed. Republicans say they don't want to add to the federal budget deficit.

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