Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi joined NPR News in May 2008 as a correspondent. She is a general assignment reporter covering business for NPR's National Desk. She began reporting for NPR in Washington during hectic times, with the 2008 presidential race underway and as the economy started to experience severe turmoil. Her stories have ranged from declines in SUV sales at Carmax to profiles of important figures involved in the Wall Street bailout. Noguchi's pieces can be heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition Sunday.

Before joining NPR, Noguchi worked at The Washington Post, first as a reporter and later as an editor. Starting in 1999, she covered economic development. Starting in 2000, she covered telecommunications and wrote stories about the major industry mergers, the Federal Communications Commission and the rise of some of the Internet giants. On the side, she also wrote about her love of swing dancing. Later, she covered consumer technology, writing features about people and their relationships with their gadgets. This was her favorite beat. Most recently, Noguchi directed the paper's coverage of national technology news. Prior to joining the Post, Noguchi reported on business and politics for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle and The Orlando Sentinel.

Noguchi's parents left Japan to study in the U.S. in the early 1970s. Noguchi and her younger brother grew up in St. Louis. She received her B.A. in history from Yale University. During a year off, she studied in Yokohama, Japan, and worked for Kyodo News Service in Tokyo. She is fluent in Japanese and speaks conversational German. She has forgotten the bulk of a class in Arabic.

Noguchi lives with her husband, Christopher Libertelli, in Bethesda, Maryland. Outside of NPR she practices yoga and still loves swing dancing.

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2:01pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Economy

System Makes It Hard To Prioritize U.S. Bill Payments

It's not yet clear if the U.S. Treasury has the ability to pick and chose who gets paid and who gets stiffed if it the $14.3 trillion debt ceiling isn't raised and it runs out of credit.

The government doesn't have flexibility like the average household might, says Jay Powell, a former Treasury undersecretary under President George H.W. Bush and a fellow at the Bipartisan Policy Center.

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2:18pm

Tue July 26, 2011
Economy

What A Credit Ratings Cut Could Mean For The U.S.

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in April. The country's credit rating could suffer if Congress fails to address the nation's long-term debt.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

With a debt ceiling deadline approaching, party leaders spent the day counting votes.

There are two plans: One, the handiwork of House Majority Leader John Boehner (R-OH), the other from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV).

The problem is that it's not clear that either one can muster the votes necessary for approval.

Monday night, President Obama dramatized the threat this way:

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1:39pm

Thu July 21, 2011
Business

One Year Later, Financial Reform Questions Remain

President Obama signs the financial reform bill into law, July 21, 2010. Vice President Joe Biden, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV), then Senate Banking Chairman Christopher Dodd (D-CT), House Financial Services Committee Chairman Barney Frank (D-MA) and other lawmakers look on.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

A year ago Thursday, jubilant Democratic lawmakers — including then-Sen. Christopher Dodd and Rep. Barney Frank — joined President Obama on stage as the president signed a new financial reform law.

"The American people will never again be asked to foot the bill for Wall Street's mistakes. There will be no more tax-funded bailouts — period," Obama said.

The so-called Dodd-Frank Act will mean no firms are too big to fail, the president said.

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3:32pm

Tue July 19, 2011
Business

Why Borders Failed While Barnes And Noble Survived

Borders Group Inc., the nation's second largest bookstore chain, announced that it will liquidate the company.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

It appears to be all over for the Borders bookselling chain. The company will be liquidated – meaning sold off in pieces – and almost 11,000 employees will lose their jobs. The chain's 400 remaining stores will close their doors by the end of September.

The retailer's first bookstore opened in Ann Arbor, Michigan 40 years ago. Along with competitor Barnes and Noble, Borders pioneered the book megastore business. But Borders made some critical missteps over the years that cost it the business.

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3:00pm

Mon July 11, 2011
NPR Story

Unions, Business Owners Face Off In Jobs Debate

With unemployment on the rise, members of the political left and right are seeking to advance their own takes on what to do about the economy. In Washington Monday, the AFL-CIO co-hosted a press conference to offer its view. Not far away, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce held its own jobs summit.

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