6:54am

Mon October 22, 2012
The Two-Way

'Light From Darkness': Another Mass Shooting Rocks Wisconsin Suburbs

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 11:30 am

Within two months, two Wisconsin suburbs have been rocked by mass shootings.

What we know so far about yesterday's shooting in Brookfield, Wis., is that a 45-year-old man allegedly walked into Azana Salon & Spa and opened fire, killing three women and injuring four.

The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reports that the alleged shooter, Radcliffe F. Haughton, was found dead inside the spa. He apparently committed suicide.

ABC News reports that police believe the incident "is domestic violence related." In recent weeks, The New York Times reports, the dispute was documented in police reports and court orders.

It's not known whether Haughton's wife, who worked at the spa, was among those killed or injured.

What is clear, the Journal-Sentinel reports, is that the shooting brought back vivid memories of the mass shooting at a Sikh Temple in Oak Creek in August.

Last night, as news of the spa shooting spread, the paper reports, members of the temple held a candlelight vigil.

The Sikhs' calm and peace despite tragedy garnered national attention. As Mark reported at the time, for the Sikhs, "anger is not just futile, it's a sin."

During the vigil, the Sentinel reports, the Sikhs expressed that same sentiment.

"Light comes from darkness, and that's a way of healing when something tragic happens," Pardeep Kaleka, whose father was one of the six killed in temple shooting, said to the paper.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker issued a statement calling the shooting a "senseless" act of violence.

"Our state will stand with the victims and their families, and we will provide them with the law enforcement and community support they need to heal in the coming days," Walker said.

Update at 1:30 p.m. ET. Wife Among The Dead:

The AP just moved this bulletin:

"Medical examiner says wife of suspected gunman among 3 shot dead at suburban Milwaukee spa."

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