All Things Considered

Weekday Evenings 2-3, 3:30 - 5:30, & 6-7
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish
Jackie Fortier

Breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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2:51pm

Sat July 2, 2011
Music Interviews

The Golden Years Of Nigerian Boogie

Art from the cover of Brand New Wayo: Funk, Fast Times and Nigerian Boogie Badness 1979-1983.
Courtesy of Comb & Razor Sound

Between 1979 and 1983, Nigeria experienced a handful of watershed moments: an oil boom, the return of democracy after years of military dictatorship, and a lot of money flooding into the country. Creative industries — music in particular — responded in kind, and suddenly Nigeria was the right place to be at the right time for musicians all over Africa.

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12:00pm

Sat July 2, 2011
Music Lists

'Global Village' Picks Latin Classics, Reinvented

Mexican singer Magos Herrera mixes bolero and jazz in "Luz de Luna."
Courtesy of the artist

As he does every so often, Betto Arcos joins Weekend All Things Considered host Guy Raz to discuss some of the music he's been spinning on his KPFK world music program Global Village. This week, Arcos offers a handful of modern artists who have mined the long, intercontinental history of Latin music for source material and inspiration.

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3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

Strauss-Kahn Released Without Bail

Former International Monetary Fund chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn was released without bail Friday after questions arose about the credibility of a woman accusing him of sexual assault.

3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

How To Cook Perfect Corn

Melissa Block gets the run down on how to cook perfect corn from Betty Fussell, author of The Story of Corn. Fussell is also a descendant of Nebraskan corn farmers.

3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

Morocco Votes On Political Reforms Referendum

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Morocco's government says voters there have overwhelmingly passed a series of constitutional reforms which will set new limits on the power of the monarchy. The landslide result was widely expected. As we reported, the reforms would keep Morocco's king as the head of state and ]the military, but the head of government would be a prime minister chosen from the largest party elected to the parliament. Members of the opposition say the changes don't go far enough and are vowing to continue their protests.

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