All Things Considered

Weekday Evenings 2-3, 3:30 - 5:30, & 6-7
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish
Jackie Fortier

Breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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4:14pm

Wed May 4, 2011
Energy

Oil Shale Plan Renews Energy Debate

Suzanne O'Neill of the Colorado Wildlife Federation testifies at a BLM hearing Wednesday in Golden.
Photo by Kirk Siegler

The Bureau of Land Management is taking a new look at oil shale development in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming, as the Obama Administration considers shelving a controversial plan stemming from the Bush Administration that opened up 1.9 million acres of land in the three states for potential leasing.

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3:53pm

Wed May 4, 2011
Planet Money

A Former Crack Kingpin On The Economics Of Illegal Drugs

The academic argument against drug criminalization goes like this.

When you make a drug illegal, you make it harder and riskier to produce. That makes it more expensive.

But demand for many drugs is what economists call inelastic: No matter what drugs cost, people will still pay. So making drugs more expensive through criminalization just sends more money to drug dealers.

That's the theory, anyway.

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3:00pm

Wed May 4, 2011
The Record

Download Sales: Will Money Stay With Labels Or Go To Musicians?

A recent move by the Supreme Court could mean millions of dollars in additional royalty payments for older musicians who signed contracts before the digital era.

Like Rick James. The funk musician died in 2004. But that hasn't stopped James' estate from suing his record label, Universal Music Group, for unpaid royalties from digital downloads.

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3:00pm

Wed May 4, 2011
National Security

After Bin Laden Raid, Some Want Out Of Afghanistan

The death of Osama bin Laden adds a powerful argument to liberal and libertarian lawmakers who say it's time to get out of Afghanistan — and save billions. Some moderates and establishment types are also chiming in that it's time to wind down. Has bin Laden's demise strengthened the out-of-Afghanistan advocates — or is it bolstering those who say his death underscores how sticking with the counterterrorism effort will ultimately pay off? NPR's David Welna reports.

3:00pm

Wed May 4, 2011
National Security

CIA Used Satellites To Prep For Bin Laden Raid

It was last August when the CIA first homed in on the compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan where Osama bin Laden was ultimately found and killed. In the months leading up to that raid, the CIA and Pentagon used an array of satellite technology and imagery to learn more about that compound and who might be inside. Melissa Block speaks with John Pike, director of Global Security.org, about satellites and imagery used before and during the Osama bin Laden campaign.

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