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Weekdays 4-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne, David Greene
Erin OToole

THE morning news magazine. Join us weekday mornings as NPR's Morning Edition gives you news, analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. Stories are told through conversation as well as full reports. It's up-to-the-minute news that prepares listeners for the day ahead.

You can also get a taste of business, the economy, and the markets with the Marketplace Morning Report - every weekday at 5:50 and 7:50

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2:00am

Tue September 13, 2011
NPR Story

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

2:00am

Tue September 13, 2011
NPR Story

Investors Want Europe To Take Bold Steps Against Crisis

Markets in Europe began the week lower on concerns Greece could be edging closer to default. Greece received an international rescue package earlier but an agreement to double the bailout's size hasn't been enacted.

2:00am

Tue September 13, 2011
NPR Story

British Banks Face Most Radical Overhaul In Decades

Britain is set to radically overhaul its financial laws. Officials say it's an attempt to prevent taxpayers from ever having to spend tens of billions of dollars to save banks from collapse.

10:01pm

Mon September 12, 2011
Tina Brown's Must-Reads

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: The Women Of The World

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 8:36 am

Tina Brown, editor of The Daily Beast and Newsweek, tells us what she's been reading in a feature that Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth.

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10:01pm

Mon September 12, 2011
Books News & Features

'Wonderstruck': A Novel Approach To Picture Books

A Wordless World: The story of Rose, a deaf little girl in Brian Selznick's Wonderstruck, is told primarily in pictures. "We experience [Rose's] story in a way that perhaps might echo the way she experiences her own life," Selznick explains.
Brian Selznick

It's not often that a writer can illustrate his own books, but Brian Selznick is that rare find. He began his career as an artist collaborating with authors on children's books. But he gradually realized that he wanted to tell his own stories in both words and pictures — and to do that, Selznick invented a unique narrative device.

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