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2:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
NPR Story

Exxon Enters Lucrative Arctic Deal With Russia

Russia and Exxon have reached an agreement that opens the way for oil exploration in the Russian sector of the Arctic Ocean. And it allows the Russians access to projects in other parts of the world, including the United States. David Greene talks to journalist Julia Ioffe, who's covering the story in Moscow.

2:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

David Greene has the Last Word in business.

2:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
NPR Story

Dominion Linemen Risk Danger To Restore Power

Hurricane Irene left millions of people up and down the East Coast without electricity. Power companies say it could be a week before service is restored everywhere. At Dominion Power in Virginia, repair teams are working 16 hour shifts.

2:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
Business

NTSB Blames PG&E For Deadly Gas Explosion

One of the nation's largest gas companies Pacific Gas & Electric is to blame for an explosion that killed eight people and burned down a neighborhood in California's Bay Area last year. That's the unanimous finding of the National Transportation Safety Board. The panel says substandard welds and other safety problems date back to the mid-1950s and that regulation was lax.

2:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
Politics

Budget Cuts Threaten NOAA's Weather Forecasts

Communities on the East Coast planned for hurricane Irene with help from analysts at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA forecasters use data from federally-funded weather satellites to predict storms. One of those satellite programs is facing deep cuts in the latest round of congressional belt-tightening.

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