Weekend Edition Saturday

Saturday Mornings 6 to 10
Scott Simon
Dan Greenwood

A weekend morning news magazine covering hard news, a wide variety of news makers, and cultural stories. On Saturdays, Simon's award-winning commentaries sum up an idea or event related to the week's news. There are clever, informative exchanges, and fresh reports from a cross-section of NPR correspondents on topics from religion to health to food to politics. Simon's interviews with key artists, authors, performers and personalities are always memorable.

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8:46am

Sat April 21, 2012
Music News

For Sale: A Record Store For The Ages

Murray Gershenz at work during the filming of Music Man Murray.
Richard Parks

There is a music store for sale in Los Angeles. It has old, sagging shelves stuffed with hundreds of thousands of recordings, from wax cylinders to 8-track tapes to LPs and CDs. The man who has owned the business since 1962 is Murray Gershenz.

"I wasn't earning enough money to support my family, so I decided to get some extra income by putting my record collection up for sale," Gershenz tells NPR's Scott Simon. "I opened the store, built some shelves with the help of a rabbi friend of mine and, little by little, the music took over."

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8:19am

Sat April 21, 2012
Simon Says

Prostitution's Real Casualties Aren't Secret Service

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 8:46 am

Six U.S. Secret Service agents have lost their jobs so far after a prostitution scandal that took place at the Hotel Caribe in Cartagena, Colombia, just before President Obama's arrival at the Summit of the Americas conference earlier this month.
Manuel Pedraza AFP/Getty Images

I've been curious about a question I haven't heard in the stories about U.S. Secret Service agents misbehaving before President Obama's arrival at the Summit of the Americas in Cartagena, Colombia.

Why were world leaders meeting in a place with legalized prostitution?

There might have been a time — after I saw Toulouse-Lautrec's poignant paintings of life in Paris brothels, or Billy Wilder's clever Irma la Douce — when I thought of prostitution as a harmless enterprise between consenting adults.

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6:00am

Sat April 21, 2012
Garden Report

Control Your Compact Conifers with Annual Pruning

Maybe we can't all achieve this level of art, but we can try...
photo by Gary Cycles Creative Commons/Flickr

Pruning shrubs may not be high on anyone’s list of fun things to do in the garden. But KUNC Gardener Tom Throgmorton says regular pruning will keep plants from taking over your landscape.

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5:41am

Sat April 21, 2012
From Our Listeners

A Clarification: No First-Class Flying Here

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 8:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A small clarification now: A few weeks ago on this program, Tom Goldman told us that he was about to catch a flight to Denver to cover the NCAA Women's Basketball championships. I joked: By the way, United Airlines, if you're listening, please upgrade Mr. Goldman - our compliments.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: I'm already first-class.

SIMON: In all ways, my friend.

GOLDMAN: Oops, did I say that?

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4:25am

Sat April 21, 2012
Author Interviews

'Steinbeck In Vietnam': A Great Writer's Last Reports

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 8:46 am

The last piece of published writing from one of America's greatest writers was a series of letters he sent back from the front lines of war at the age of 64.

John Steinbeck's reports shocked readers and family so much that they've never been reprinted — until now.

Steinbeck won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962 for a life's work writing about those who had been roughed up by history — most notably his Depression-era novels, Of Mice And Men and The Grapes of Wrath. Four years later, Steinbeck left for Vietnam to cover the war firsthand.

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