Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Mornings from 6 to 10
Rachel Martin
Dan Greenwood

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Hansen on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

Another trademark of Sunday's program is "Voices in the News," a montage of sound bites from the past week, poignant in its simplicity. Hansen also engages listeners in her discussions with regular contributors, who cover a wide range of national and international issues.

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5:27am

Sun October 9, 2011
Music Interviews

Rick Rubin, Russell Simmons: Def Jam's First 25 Years

Russell Simmons and Rick Rubin as new business partners, in a mid-'80s candid shot from Def Jam Recordings: The First 25 Years of the Last Great Record Label.

Adler Archive

Behind every great pop music genre, there's a record label that launched its stars. Blue Note pushed Theolonious Monk and Art Blakey into the mainstream. Sun Records brought us Elvis and Jerry Lee Lewis.

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10:01pm

Sat October 8, 2011
Sunday Puzzle

A Highly Logical Christopher Columbus

On-Air Challenge: Identify errors of fact, logic and grammar in a short essay on Christopher Columbus.

Last Week's Challenge: Think of a common one-word entrée and dessert. When you insert the name of the entrée into the dessert's name, it will read as a certain meal. Name the entrée, dessert and meal.

Answer: The entrée "lamb" can be inserted into the dessert "cake" to make "clambake."

Winner: Tony DeCusatis from Wayne, Pa.

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10:00am

Sat October 8, 2011
The Record

21st Century Protest Music: Will There Be Another Dylan? Should There Be?

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 2:23 pm

Zuccotti Park on Oct. 6. The people making music during the Occupy Wall Street protests are not celebrities.

David Shankbone flickr.com

The other day I posed a question on my Twitter feed: What is the music of Occupy Wall Street? As a veteran of many street protests and an amateur historian of popular music rabble rousing, I've been waiting for someone to grab center stage in Zuccoti Square and emerge as a new Bob Dylan or Joan Baez.

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6:00am

Sun October 2, 2011
Music News

Beethoven's Lost Work No Longer Imaginary

In 1800 Ludwig van Beethoven dumped and re-wrote the whole second movement of his String Quartet in G, Opus 18, No. 2. Most scholars thought the original draft was lost, but a music professor from the University of Manchester has reconstructed what he thinks that first version might have sounded like. Host Audie Cornish talks with violinist Vlad Bogdanas of the Quatuor Danel string quartet, which debuted the piece last week.

6:00am

Sun October 2, 2011
NPR Story

Syrian Army Faces Its Own Among Protesters

The Syrian government is continuing its brutal crackdown against protesters. For much of the past week, there have also been clashes between security forces and armed militants in the central town of Rastan and elsewhere. Most of those resisting the government with arms are thought to be defectors from the Syrian army. Host Audie Cornish talks with NPR's Deb Amos from Beirut, where she has been monitoring the Syrian crisis.

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