Agriculture

6:00am

Sun September 1, 2013
Agriculture

My Farm Roots: Community Counts

Matt Pauly grew up in rural Kansas. After living in Europe and Asia, he moved back to the Midwest and now lives in Lawrence, Kan.
Credit Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

Matt Pauly has traveled the world  – he’s lived in New York, Paris, South Korea – but he’s still a farm boy at heart.

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5:02pm

Thu August 29, 2013
Agriculture

Changing Times Brings Adaptation To Colorado State Fair

Marley Nahum of Douglas, Co., Colo. shows her prize-winning chicken at the state fair's youth livestock auction.
Luke Runyon KUNC and Harvest Public Media

Not just in Colorado, but all across the country, more people are moving from rural towns to cities. Since it takes fewer people to run farms these days, what’s the role of one of rural america’s the highest profile institutions: the state fair?

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4:01pm

Thu August 29, 2013
The Salt

Antibiotic Use On The Farm: Are We Flying Blind?

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 3:26 pm

8:20am

Wed August 28, 2013
The Salt

To Grow Sweeter Produce, California Farmers Turn Off The Water

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 10:57 am

At Happy Boy Farms near Santa Cruz, Calif., Early Girl tomatoes are grown using dry-farming methods. The tomatoes have become increasingly popular with chefs and wholesalers.
Courtesy Jen Lynne/Happy Boy Farms

A week without water can easily kill the average person.

But a garden that goes unwatered for months may produce sweeter, more flavorful fruits than anything available in most mainstream supermarkets — even in the scorching heat of a California summer. Commercial growers call it "dry farming," and throughout the state, this unconventional technique seems to be catching on among small producers of tomatoes, apples, grapes, melons and potatoes.

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1:21am

Tue August 27, 2013
The Salt

Turning Off The Spigot In Western Kansas Farmland

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 12:49 pm

An irrigation pivot waters a corn field in Nebraska. Many farmers in Nebraska and Kansas rely on irrigation to water their corn fields. But the underground aquifer they draw from will run dry.
Nati Harnik AP

Across the High Plains, many farmers depend on underground stores of water, and they worry about wells going dry. A new scientific study of western Kansas lays out a predicted timeline for those fears to become reality. But it also shows an alternative path for farming in Kansas: The moment of reckoning can be delayed, and the impact softened, if farmers start conserving water now.

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