Agriculture

4:30pm

Mon March 25, 2013
The Salt

Are Agriculture's Most Popular Insecticides Killing Our Bees?

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 8:42 am

Workers clear honey from dead beehives at a bee farm east of Merced, Calif.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Environmentalists and beekeepers are calling on the government to ban some of the country's most widely used insect-killing chemicals.

The pesticides, called neonicotinoids, became popular among farmers during the 1990s. They're used to coat the seeds of many agricultural crops, including the biggest crop of all: corn. Neonics, as they're called, protect those crops from insect pests.

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11:20am

Mon March 25, 2013
Environment

EPA Stung With Lawsuit Over Potentially Bee-Killing Pesticides

Michael Myers Creative Commons/Flickr

A coalition of beekeepers and environmental groups says the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency isn’t doing enough to protect the nation’s declining bee population from pesticides.

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9:59am

Sun March 24, 2013
The Salt

Backyard Chickens: Cute, Trendy Spreaders Of Salmonella

Backyard chickens can be a great hobby. They can also spread disease.
iStockphoto.com

Backyard chickens have become a coveted suburban accessory, one that packages cuteness, convenience and local food production in one fluffy feathered package.

But animal husbandry can be a nasty business, a fact that's often glossed over by poultry partisans like Martha Stewart and New Yorker writer Susan Orlean.

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10:03pm

Sat March 23, 2013
Buried In Grain

Should Grain Bins On Farms Be Regulated, Too?

Two young workers died in flowing corn at this commercial grain storage complex in Mount Carroll, Ill., in 2010. OSHA regulates 13,000 commercial grain bins like these. But grain bins on 300,000 family farms are largely exempt from OSHA regulations.
John W. Poole NPR

The commercial grain industry responded to a record number of grain entrapments and deaths in 2010 with more safety videos, publications and training programs.

"Have tragic incidents still happened? Yes," says Jeff Adkisson, who heads the Grain and Feed Association of Illinois. "Are we working to reduce them further? Absolutely."

Randy Gordon, president of the National Grain and Feed Association, sees no need for additional regulations. "The [occupational safety and health] standards, we think, are very adequate to address this danger," he says.

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4:28pm

Thu March 21, 2013
The Salt

Did Congress Just Give GMOs A Free Pass In The Courts?

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 12:58 pm

Farmers harvest a sugar beet crop in Gilcrest, Colo.
Matthew Staver Landov

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