Agriculture

1:05am

Wed September 19, 2012
The Salt

So What Happens If The Farm Bill Expires? Not Much, Right Away

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 2:53 pm

Sens. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., and Pat Toomey, R-Pa., talk to reporters about the farm bill at the U.S. Capitol in June.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Congress is set to make a brief appearance in Washington this week, then recess until after Election Day. That means a farm bill is likely to be left undone, just one of the many items on lawmakers' "to-do" lists that won't happen anytime soon.

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1:44pm

Mon September 17, 2012
The Salt

Shriveled Mich. Apple Harvest Means Fewer Jobs, Tough Year Ahead

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 12:42 pm

A lonely Michigan apple.
Noah Adams NPR

An apple a day might keep the doctor away, but what do you do when there are no apples? It's a question western Michigan's apple growers are dealing with this season after strange weather earlier in the year decimated the state's apple cultivation.

Michigan is the third-largest apple producer in the U.S. after New York and Washington, but the state's apples will soon be in short supply. Now in the middle of harvest season, growers are picking only 10 percent to 15 percent of their normal crop.

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4:41am

Sun September 16, 2012
Around the Nation

Still Home Sweet Home More Than A Century Later

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 6:36 am

Lee and Shirley Wohler in the kitchen of their farmhouse south of Waterville, Kan.
Becky Sullivan NPR

This year, the Homestead Act of 1862 turned 150. That landmark piece of legislation opened up the Western territories to settlement. Almost anybody could receive up to 160 acres for free if they built a house and "improved" the land over the course of five years. Millions took part, and eventually, more than 10 percent of all U.S. land was given away.

A German peasant named Frederick Wohler was one of those early homesteaders. Wohler received the deed to 80 acres of farmland in north-central Kansas 138 years ago this weekend. And today, the Wohlers are still there.

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3:01pm

Tue September 11, 2012
Agriculture

Hay Rises in Demand, Prompts Theft from Local Farmers

Walt Hubis Flickr - Creative Commons

The scarcity and sky-high price of hay is causing worry among some Colorado livestock producers.

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11:47am

Wed September 5, 2012
Planet Money

Inflation Isn't About The Price Of Corn. It's About Wages.

Originally published on Wed September 5, 2012 11:49 am

FRED

Corn prices are going through the roof. The price of gasoline is rising again. Inflation, though, is still low.What's more, as Bloomberg notes today, investors are betting that inflation will remain low for years to come.

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