Animals/Wildlife

5:43am

Thu November 29, 2012
Strange News

A Night Of Spectacle In New York City

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 7:18 am

3:28pm

Wed November 28, 2012
The Two-Way

Despite Protection Efforts, Rhino Poaching Soars

Originally published on Wed November 28, 2012 3:52 pm

Miles Lappeman (left) and his son Marc with the carcass of a rhino that was killed for its horn at their Finfoot Lake Reserve on Nov. 24 in South Africa. This was one of eight rhinos slaughtered by poachers.
Nicolene Olckers Foto24/Gallo Images/Getty Images

Just a few years ago, rhino poaching appeared to be more or less under control.

Shootings were relatively rare, and about 75 percent of the world's rhinos lived in South Africa, a country that has taken extensive efforts to protect them.

Just 13 rhinos were reported killed worldwide in 2007. But the figure has been surging in recent years and has already hit 588 so far this year, according to conservation groups.

An estimated 25,000 rhinos remain in Africa.

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6:59am

Wed November 28, 2012

3:57pm

Mon November 26, 2012
U.S.

Will Florida Pythons Slither To Rest Of The U.S.?

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 4:42 pm

A Burmese python coils around the arm of a hunter during a news conference in 2010 in the Florida Everglades. New research suggests that the pythons won't spread through the American Southeast, as previously believed.
Lynne Sladky AP

There are several exotic snake species that have become a problem in the Everglades. But for wildlife managers, the biggest headache is the Burmese python.

Earlier this year, researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey captured the largest Burmese python yet in Everglades National Park. Three USGS staffers had to wrestle the snake out of a plastic crate to measure it. The snake was a 17-foot-7-inch female carrying 87 eggs.

Wildlife managers are working to get a handle on the problem of exotic snakes in South Florida; but the snakes have already made a big impact.

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11:43am

Mon November 26, 2012
The Two-Way

Paying For Success: River Otters Are Being Trapped Again In Illinois

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 3:30 pm

Once almost gone from Illinois, river otters are now back in big numbers.
Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources
  • On 'Morning Edition': Steve Inskeep speaks Illinois biologist Bob Bluett

"They're wonderful, they're great. But sometimes too much is too much."

That's the basic problem confronting Illinois and its wild river otters, state Department of Natural Resources biologist Bob Bluett said earlier today on Morning Edition.

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