Animals/Wildlife

7:33am

Fri October 5, 2012
The Two-Way

Coyotes In The City: Could Urban Bears Be Next?

A coyote takes a ride on a light rail train in Portland, Ore., back in 2002. The wild canines are becoming more and more comfortable living in cities.
Dennis Maxwell AP

Meet the new urbanites: They have long, furry muzzles, piercing, yellow eyes and are very, very wily.

They're coyotes.

Until recently, scientists who study wildlife thought coyotes couldn't live in heavily populated areas. Wild carnivorous animals and humans don't typically mix.

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11:55am

Wed October 3, 2012
The Two-Way

Manhunt For Manatee-Riding Lady Comes To An End In Florida

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 12:19 pm

Ana Gloria Garcia Gutierrez is seen attempting to ride a manatee.
Pinellas County Sheriff's Office

For a short period, yesterday, the hunt was on in Pinellas County, Florida for a lady photographed riding a manatee.

The sheriff's department called a deadly serious press conference in which they asked the help of the public in identifying the perpetrator. The lady was wearing a white cap, red shorts and a black bikini top. Witnesses in the area, the sheriff said in a statement, took photographs and contacted police.

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11:15am

Wed September 26, 2012
World

Badger Battle: British Animal Lovers Protest Cull

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 3:54 pm

Badgers have been blamed for spreading disease among cattle in Britain. But a campaign to cull the badgers has been met with opposition from prominent figures like Queen guitarist Brian May, who joined this rally in Bristol earlier this month.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

The badger, a stalwart of BBC nature programs, is one of Britain's most beloved animals and is a protected species.

To many English dairy farmers, though, this timid omnivore with the black and white stripes is a mobile biological weapon, exposing their cows to bovine tuberculosis through its urine and saliva.

And they've persuaded the British government to sanction extreme measures.

This month, the government issued licenses allowing trained marksmen to wipe out 70 percent of the badger populations in two pilot areas.

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11:14am

Wed September 26, 2012
Animals

Mammalian Surprise: African Mouse Can Regrow Skin

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 3:54 pm

The African spiny mouse has the ability to regrow large patches of skin and hair without scarring.
Ashley W. Seifert Nature

Scientists have discovered that a mouse found in Africa can lose large patches of skin and then grow it back without scarring, perhaps as a way of escaping the clutches of a predator.

The finding challenges the conventional view that mammals have an extremely limited ability to replace injured body parts. There are lizards that can regrow lost tails, salamanders that can replace amputated legs, and fish that can generate new fins, but humans and other mammals generally patch up wounds with scar tissue.

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5:06am

Wed September 26, 2012
Around the Nation

See You Later Alligator, At My Kid's Party

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 8:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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