Arts & Life

2:57pm

Thu August 30, 2012
The Salt

On the Farmers Market Frontier, It's Not Just About Profit

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:30 am

On a corner in Washington, D.C., where stores burned during riots 44 years ago, there's now a plaza where farmers sell produce on Saturday mornings.
Dan Charles/NPR

Farmers markets are popping up in cities all across the country, and people expect lots of different things from them: Better food, of course, but also economic development and even friendlier neighborhoods.

At its core, though, the farmers market is a business, and it won't survive unless the farmer makes money.

So what's the key to success for these markets?

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12:58pm

Thu August 30, 2012
The Salt

Introducing Microgreens: Younger, And Maybe More Nutritious, Vegetables

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:33 am

Brendan Davison grows 11 kinds of microgreens, including arugula and basil, at his Good Water Farms in East Hampton, N.Y.
Lindsay Morris

We've come to accept the baby-fication of our vegetables – baby spinach, baby lettuce, and baby squash prized for their tenderness and cute size have staked out territory in the produce section of many a grocery store.

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1:19am

Thu August 30, 2012
The Salt

Subtracting Calories May Not Add Years To Life

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 8:34 am

A rhesus monkey eats watermelon, provided by zookeepers, at the Kamla Nehru Zoological Gardens in India in May 2012.
Sam Panthaky AFP/Getty Images

Scientists have known for decades that lab rats and mice will live far longer than normal if they're fed a super-low-calorie diet, and that's led some people to eat a near-starvation diet in the hopes that it will extend the human life span, too.

But a new study in monkeys suggests they may be disappointed.

The long-awaited results of this study, which started back in 1987, show that rhesus monkeys fed a diet with 30 percent fewer calories than normal did not live unusually long lives.

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1:17am

Thu August 30, 2012
Destination Art

Hannibal, Mo.: Art Abounds In Twain's Hometown

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 3:56 am

Twain's boyhood home in Hannibal, pictured circa 1955, is now a museum.
Three Lions Getty Images

Samuel Clemens, who is said to have taken his pen name Mark Twain from the cries of riverboat crewmen, found the inspiration for his classic works while growing up in the river town of Hannibal, Mo. Today, more than 125 years after the first pressing of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, there's a new set of artistic characters in Twain's boyhood home.

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2:04pm

Wed August 29, 2012
The Salt

Unraveling The Mystery Of A Grandmother's Lost Ravioli Recipe

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 3:11 pm

Italian food expert Julia della Croce suggested Benner try a Tuscan sheep's cheese, or pecorino Toscano, for the filling.
Courtesy of Celina della Croce

NPR listener Alice Benner says her Italian grandmother made ravioli that was "indescribably delicious."

Benner told us that she's tried to re-create the recipe many times. "The dough — the consistency — is totally wrong, usually too thick," she writes.

Benner's grandmother used Romano cheese in the filling — probably from an Italian deli in Chicago — but Benner says when she makes the ravioli, "the Romano cheese I've used never has the same punch. I've all but given up trying to make them."

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